Song of Moses - God's Redemption
Dr. Joe Temple

Introduction

Open your Bibles, please, to the book of Exodus, chapter 15. We have accompanied the children of Israel out of the land of Egypt, across the Red Sea pursued by the Egyptians, depending upon God's Word that He would deliver them. As soon as the last of the Israelites reached shore, the waters came together and the Egyptians were drowned, trying to do what the Israelites did.

Song Begins and Ends With the Land

In chapter 15, we will meditate together on a song of which Moses led the children of Israel in singing after they crossed the Red Sea:

Exodus 15

1Then sang Moses and the children of Israel this song unto the LORD, and spake, saying, I will sing unto the LORD, for he hath triumphed gloriously: the horse and his rider hath he thrown into the sea.
2The LORD is my strength and song, and he is become my salvation: he is my God, and I will prepare him an habitation; my father's God, and I will exalt him.
3The LORD is a man of war: the LORD is his name.
4Pharaoh's chariots and his host hath he cast into the sea: his chosen captains also are drowned in the Red Sea.
5The depths have covered them: they sank into the bottom as a stone.
6Thy right hand, O LORD, is become glorious in power: thy right hand, O LORD, hath dashed in pieces the enemy.
7And in the greatness of thine excellency thou hast overthrown them that rose up against thee: thou sentest forth thy wrath, which consumed them as stubble.
8And with the blast of thy nostrils the waters were gathered together, the floods stood upright as an heap, and the depths were congealed in the heart of the sea.
9The enemy said, I will pursue, I will overtake, I will divide the spoil; my lust shall be satisfied upon them; I will draw my sword, my hand shall destroy them.
10Thou didst blow with thy wind, the sea covered them: they sank as lead in the mighty waters.
11Who is like unto thee, O LORD, among the gods? who is like thee, glorious in holiness, fearful in praises, doing wonders?
12Thou stretchest out thy right hand, the earth swallowed them.
13Thou in mercy hast led forth the people which thou hast redeemed: thou hast guided them in thy strength unto thy holy habitation.
14The people shall hear, and be afraid: sorrow shall take hold on the inhabitants of Palestina.
15Then the dukes of Edom shall be amazed; the mighty men of Moab, trembling shall take hold upon them; all the inhabitants of Canaan shall melt away.
16Fear and dread shall fall upon them; by the greatness of thine arm they shall be as still as a stone; till thy people pass over, O LORD, till the people pass over, which thou hast purchased.
17Thou shalt bring them in, and plant them in the mountain of thine inheritance, in the place, O LORD, which thou hast made for thee to dwell in, in the Sanctuary, O LORD, which thy hands have established.
18The LORD shall reign for ever and ever.
19For the horse of Pharaoh went in with his chariots and with his horsemen into the sea, and the LORD brought again the waters of the sea upon them; but the children of Israel went on dry land in the midst of the sea.
20And Miriam the prophetess, the sister of Aaron, took a timbrel in her hand; and all the women went out after her with timbrels and with dances.
21And Miriam answered them, Sing ye to the LORD, for he hath triumphed gloriously; the horse and his rider hath he thrown into the sea.

These 21 verses, which include the added refrain by Miriam and the women of Israel, make a song of two stanzas. The first stanza comprises the first twelve verses; the second stanza begins with verse 13 and goes through verse 18. The song itself ends with verse 18. The first stanza has to do with the past, and the second stanza has to do with the present or the future. The second stanza is based upon the first; because of God's performances in the first, encouragement to believe it is granted in the second.

It is a song which begins and ends with the Lord. We are told first, “Then sang Moses and the children of Israel this song unto the Lord.” The last thing mentioned in verse 18 is, “The LORD shall reign for ever and ever.” It begins and ends with the Lord.

A Song of Praise and Worship

It not only begins and ends with the Lord, but it is a song truly unto the Lord; it is a song of worship; it is a song of praise. If you were to take the time to do a little counting you would find the name of the Lord mentioned eighteen times in twelve verses. The pronouns which refer to Him, such as “His” and “Thy” and “Thou” are used some thirty-one times in the entire song. The word “self” or any reference to “self” is not found in the song. This song is one of real worship; not too many of our songs are so written. If you stop to think of it, many of our songs speak of our needs and our problems and our burdens; not too many songs are for the Lord Himself. The Lord should be the object of our worship and the theme of our song indeed.

This is the first song that is recorded in the Bible. You do not hear about people singing until you get to chapter 15 of the book of Exodus. This first song is related to the last song service that is recorded in the Bible. It would be interesting to notice that song also. Turn with me, please, to the book of Revelation, chapter 15. Exodus, chapter 15, records the first song in the Bible; Revelation, chapter 15, records the last time the song is used:

Revelation 15

1And I saw another sign in heaven, great and marvellous, seven angels having the seven last plagues; for in them is filled up the wrath of God.
2And I saw as it were a sea of glass mingled with fire: and them that had gotten the victory over the beast (the Antichrist) , and over his image, and over his mark, and over the number of his name, (I saw them) stand on the sea of glass, having the harps of God.

These people are in Heaven; they have come out of great tribulation. Notice verse 3:

Revelation 15

3And they sing the song of Moses the servant of God, and the song of the Lamb, saying, Great and marvellous are thy works, Lord God Almighty; just and true are thy ways, thou King of saints [or thou King of nations] .

The people who are in Heaven will be singing the song of Moses.

Victory Through God's Intervention

I would not be dogmatic, but I cannot help but be interested in the fact that the first time this song is mentioned is in chapter 15 of the book of Exodus, and the last time it is mentioned is in chapter 15 of the book of Revelation. Numbers are significant in the Word of God, and I believe that the Holy Spirit has watched over the translation of our Bible and its division into chapters to such an extent that even the chapter numbers themselves are significant. For example, fifteen is a number that is derived from multiplying three by five. Three is the number of God, and five is the number of man's weakness.

In chapter 14 of the book of Exodus, we find nothing but man's weakness; in chapter 15, we find man's weakness overshadowed by God, and we find a song of redemption, a song of victory. The same thing is true in the book of Revelation, chapters 14 and 15. For what it is worth, this song is sung because of God's intervention. If God had never intervened in the midst of the weakness of man, this song never could have been sung.

The Largest Choir

I like to think about the background of this song; and when I do, I am reminded that this probably was the largest congregational singing that has ever happened–the largest choir, if you want to put it that way. Meetings such as the Billy Graham meetings may have choirs of as many as a thousand voices, and that is a tremendous thing. But you will remember that there were three million people who left the land of Egypt, and as they crossed the sea and stood safely on the other side, they lifted their voices in praise to God; three million people sang this song unto the Lord.

Verse 1 of chapter 15 gives us the date of the song. The date of the song is not important as far as the calender is concerned, but it is important as far as spiritual experience is concerned. I would like to emphasize that in our thinking.

When Sighing Becomes Singing

Turn back, please, to chapter 5 of the book of Exodus and notice verse 15:

Exodus 5

15Then the officers of the children of Israel came and cried unto Pharaoh, saying, Wherefore dealest thou thus with thy servants?
16There is no straw given unto thy servants, and they say to us, Make brick: and, behold, thy servants are beaten; but the fault is in thine own people.
17But he said, Ye are idle, ye are idle: therefore ye say, Let us go and do sacrifice to the LORD.
18Go therefore now, and work; for there shall no straw be given you, yet shall ye deliver the tale of bricks.
19And the officers of the children of Israel did see that they were in evil case, after it was said, Ye shall not minish aught from your bricks of your daily task.
20And they met Moses and Aaron, who stood in the way, as they came forth from Pharaoh:
21And they said unto them, the LORD look upon you, and judge; because ye have made our savour to be abhorred in the eyes of Pharaoh, and in the eyes of his servants, to put a sword in their hand to slay us.
22And Moses returned unto the LORD, and said, LORD, wherefore hast thou so evil entreated this people? Why is it that thou hast sent me?
23For since I came to Pharaoh to speak in thy name, he hath done evil to this people; neither hast thou delivered thy people at all.

There was one continual complaint from the children of Israel in the land of Egypt. As the complaint rose up to the ears of God, we are told that God heard the sighing of the children of Israel in the midst of their bondage. But when we come to chapter 15 of the book of Exodus, there is no longer sighing; there is singing. Do you know what has made the difference? Redemption. As long as the Israelites were in the land of Egypt, they could do nothing but sigh because of the weight of their burdens; but when they were delivered from the land of Egypt and were safely on the other side of the sea, they could do nothing else but sing.

A New Song

Turn with me, please, to Psalm 40 for an illustration of what I am talking about, because there is a tremendously important spiritual lesson that we need to learn from the little word “then,” which is the first word in the account of Moses' song. You will hear David saying:

Psalm 40

1I waited patiently for the LORD; and he inclined unto me, and heard my cry.
2He brought me up also out of an horrible pit, out of the miry clay, and set my feet upon a rock, and established my goings.
3He hath put a new song in my mouth, even praise unto our God: many shall see it, and fear, and shall trust in the LORD.

What is David saying? “He hath put a new song in my mouth.” When did God cause David to sing? Certainly not in the first verse, because the first verse speaks of his impatient waiting. He had prayed and God had seemingly turned a deaf ear to his prayer; he was not getting anywhere at all. Certainly he was not singing in verse 2, because in verse 2 he was in a horrible pit; he was in miry clay, and there was not anything to sing about.

David is speaking about a spiritual experience here; he is speaking about an experience which all of us have had at some time or other–a time when we were utterly helpless before God because we realized that we were unsaved and that we could not save ourselves. We were in a horrible pit; we were in miry clay in the sense that if we tried to climb out of that pit, we slipped right back in again, just as anyone who tried to climb out over slippery clay.

Actually, this word “miry clay” is very much akin to a word which would describe quicksand, the idea being that when you take one step up you are drawn back two steps. It is a hopeless situation. But what do we read here in this verse? That the Lord took him out of the pit, out of the miry clay; He set his feet upon a rock; He established his goings. Then David began to sing. Only then, when he was out of the pit and his feet were upon a solid rock, did he have a song in his mouth.

You may take issue with what I am going to say, but before you do, give some consideration to it. I think you will find that it is true. Unsaved people don't know how to sing joyfully. Stop to think about that. Think about all the songs that are written by unsaved people. How many of them are written on a mournful theme; how many of them are written in a minor key because they have no song in their heart.

The Psalmist said, “The Lord hath put a new song in my mouth.” That is exactly what He did for the nation of Israel: “Then sang Moses and the children of Israel this song unto the LORD, and spake, saying, I will sing unto the LORD, for he hath triumphed gloriously…” and they describe the glorious triumph of the Lord.

The Battle is the Lord's

This song presents a real problem to liberalists. It presents a real problem to modernists, because they are quite concerned that Moses would be praising the Lord for doing such a horrible thing as killing all these Egyptians in the sea. They even go so far as to criticize God and say, “It is strange that God would act in that fashion.” They become exceedingly alarmed to hear Moses saying, “The LORD is a man of war: the LORD is his name,” because they like to think that God is all love and has nothing to do with judgment of any kind. Moses did not think that. In verse 4 he goes somewhat into detail as to what has been accomplished:

Exodus 15

4Pharaoh's chariots and his host hast he cast into the sea: his chosen captains also are drowned in the Red Sea.
5The depths have covered them: they sank into the bottom as a stone.

Moses is not putting it very softly or gently, is he? In verse 6 he describes how it was brought about:

Exodus 15

6Thy right hand, O LORD, is become glorious in power: thy right hand, O LORD, hath dashed in pieces the enemy.

Does it sound strange that God should be acting in this fashion? Well, it shouldn't. Do you know why God is acting in this way? Because He is interested in His own; that is why. He is interested in His own people. Glance back at verse 14 of chapter 14 and notice what God had said to the children of Israel when the Red Sea was before them, the enemy behind them, the desert on one side and the mountains on the other side. God said, “The Lord shall fight for you, and ye shall hold your peace.” Well, all Moses was doing was praising the Lord for His fighting for His own. The battle is not yours; it is the Lord's (II Chronicles 20:15).

I believe with all my heart that regardless of who our enemies may be, regardless of what our problems may be, the battle is not ours; it is the Lord's. I believe that the Lord is as able to fight for us as He fought for these Egyptians. I believe that all we need to do is to give Him an opportunity to do it, because what becomes an insurmountable thing for us is practically nothing to Him.

I have always been interested in the manner in which Moses described the battle: “Really not much of a battle at all.” In verse 8 he said:

Exodus 15

8And with the blast of thy nostrils the waters were gathered together, the floods stood upright as an heap, and the depths were congealed in the heart of the sea.

Then glance at verse 10:

Exodus 15

10Thou didst blow with thy wind, the sea covered them: they sank as lead in the mighty waters.

Think about it; the armies of an entire nation were gathered against God's helpless people, and all God needed to do was blow on them–that was all–and they were brought to an utter end. Aren't we a bit foolish to get as alarmed as we do about our security and our safety when God is able to fight for His children in just that fashion–just by the breath of His nostrils? Just one little breath, and the enemies are gone!

God Disposes of His Enemies

Turn, please, to Psalm 2 for an illustration of how God really feels about His foes. Oh, we have such an exalted sense of our importance sometimes, but God does not feel that way at all. In Psalm 2, the word “heathen” would better be translated “nations,” because that is what it means. When we use the word “heathen” we are inclined to think of someone in the darkest of Africa, but the word “heathen” as it is used here could refer to the scientists of Russia, for that matter, with all their intelligence and all their abilities:

Psalm 2

1Why do the [ nations ] rage, and the people imagine a vain thing?
2The kings of the earth set themselves, and the rulers take counsel together, against the LORD, and against his anointed, saying,
3Let us break their bands asunder, and cast away their cords from us.

That is what Russia has done openly, and that is what some folk in this country are trying to do subtly, not openly. They are trying to cast asunder the government and jurisdiction of God–to pull God from His throne. But look at verse 4. Does that alarm God; does He get disturbed about it?

Psalm 2

4He that sitteth in the heavens shall laugh: the LORD shall have them in derision.
5Then shall he speak unto them in his wrath, and vex them in his sore displeasure.

The Lord is still on His throne, and He is able to take care of all these enemies. Just as He disposed of the enemies of Israel with the breath of His mouth, He is able to dispose of our enemies today if we but give Him the opportunity.

Recognize God's Wonders

Notice verse 11 of Exodus, chapter 15. Thinking about all that God had done for them before they crossed the Red Sea, they exclaimed:

Exodus 15

11Who is like unto thee, O LORD, among the gods? who is like thee, glorious in holiness, fearful in praise, doing wonders?

Who is like unto thee, O Lord? Have you ever asked that question in your own mind? If you have not, perhaps it is because you have never recognized God's wonders! Notice what He said in the last part of verse 11: “Who is like unto thee, glorious in holiness, fearful in praises, doing wonders?” We do not have time for a testimony meeting, but if we did, would you be able to stand to your feet and tell of some of the wonders God has performed in your life? Have you lived deep enough with God and had enough personal experience with Him that you can talk about some of the wonderful things He has done for you–more wonderful than most people know anything about? I think the reason why in many cases God does not mean any more to us than He does is that we do not live deep enough with Him, and we do not go far enough along with Him to give Him the opportunity to perform some of these wonders.

Put yourself in the position of these Israelites for a moment. You know how they felt on the Egyptian side of the sea, don't you? They were scared to death! Not only were they scared to death, but they were even a little bit bitter. “Why do we have to be in this place? We've come out here to die! It would have been better for us to die in Egypt than to come out here”–and on and on they went. But realize that they would never have been able to sing this song if they had not been in the place where they had to stand still and see the salvation of the Lord.

When we get in these trying places and are face to face with things we cannot handle, if we would let the Lord work, it would not be long until we would be on the other side of the Red Sea, and we would be able to sing a song just like this: “Lord, who is like unto Thee, who is able to do the great and wonderful things which Thou dost do?”

Have you been to the Red Sea place in your life where there was nothing you could do but stand still? If the Lord Jesus Christ tarries, I believe you will get to that place sooner or later. It will be wonderful to sing a song of praise when you see the Lord deliver.

Confidence In God's Word

Let us notice the second part of this song. This is wonderful to me, because the passage from verse 13 to verse 18 is all future. Moses' faith was wonderful, but if you leave out his faith, his grammar was terrible, because he spoke of the future in the past tense, and that is never done. But do you know how he could do that? Because as far as he was concerned, it was finished; there was no doubt in his mind that it would happen.

Look at verse 13, which is the theme verse of the entire book of Exodus. We look at it now not from that standpoint, but as part of the song:

Exodus 15

13Thou in thy mercy hast led forth the people which thou hast redeemed: thou hast guided them in thy strength unto thy holy habitation.

Did you notice what he was saying? Here they were, one step on the other side of the Red Sea. But as far as Moses was concerned they were already through the desert and into the place of God's holy habitation. Why would he say that? Because he believed God; that is why. He believed that God was able to finish what He had started; it was just a matter of waiting God's time.

Turn with me, please, to Philippians, chapter 1, for a verse of Scripture the truth of which I believe Moses knew. That is why he could write as he wrote. This verse is a great comfort to my own heart. We will begin with verse 3 to get the sense of it:

Philippians 1

3I thank my God upon every remembrance of you,
4Always in every prayer of mine for you all making request with joy,
5For your fellowship in the gospel from the first day until now;
6Being confident of this very thing, that he which hath begun a good work in you will perform it until the day of Jesus Christ:

When Moses and his people stepped out on the other side of the Red Sea, God had just begun the work; but Moses believed that He would perform it, that He would not stop until it was finished.

Does that not encourage your hearts? I don't know your hearts; you are the only ones who do; but let me ask you a question: Do you know the Lord Jesus Christ as your Savior? Have you ever been born again? Have you really trusted Him? You are the only one who really knows that, because you are the one who must tell the Lord that you are a sinner on the basis of the fact that all have sinned and come short of the glory of God (Romans 3:23). You are the one who has to tell the Lord that you believe that He came into the world to save you, and you are the one who has to ask Him to save you. Have you done that? If you have not, you can do it right now, because it does not take a lot of pleading; it does not take a lot of begging. All it takes is to reach out for the gift that God offers you.

But suppose you have. God has just begun the work in you. Someone comes along and says, “Are you going to Heaven?” You say, “Well, I don't know; I hope so, but I don't know whether I'm going or not.” One of two things is true: Either you don't understand the Word of God, or you don't believe what God says. If you understand the Word of God, you know that He which hath begun a good work in you will perform it until the day of Jesus Christ. He has just begun it, but He will finish it. That is what Moses said when they were just one step on the other side of the Red Sea. He said, “Lord, we are already home; we are already in Thy holy habitation.”

Turn with me, please, to chapter 8 of the book of Romans, and notice another verse of Scripture which has always been a great comfort to my heart when I take a good square look at myself, with all my faults and failings, and the manner in which I disappoint the Lord. Notice verse 29:

Romans 8

29For whom he did foreknow, he also did predestinate to be conformed to the image of his Son, that he might be the firstborn among many brethren.
30Moreover whom he did predestinate, them he also called; them he also justified: and whom he justified, them he also glorified.

Beloved, this is a process of redemption. This is exactly what Moses was thinking about. First of all, it goes back to the foreknowledge of God, in verse 29. Don't be alarmed at that word. Theologians have argued about it, and people have been disturbed about it, but all in the world it means is that God knows everything; that is all. He knows what is going to happen before it ever happens, and that does not trouble me. If my God were not like that, He would not be much of a God.

Understanding Predestination

He knows, and because of what He knows, he predestinates. Don't be afraid of the word “predestinate.” A lot of people are, and they just hurry over it when they see it in the Bible. All in the world predestination means is that God brings certain things to pass to enable certain things to happen; that is all in the world it means. A lot of people, you know, think the word “predestination” means that God slaps you over the head and makes you do what He wants you to do whether you want to do it or not. That is not predestination. Predestination means simply that He sets the wheels in motion to accomplish what is going to be.

Let me give you a little human illustration, but keep in mind that human illustrations always fall short; there is no perfect human illustration of a spiritual truth. God knew last week that I would need to go to El Paso, and so what did He do? He began to bring to pass certain events which would make possible my going to El Paso. He did not force me to go; He did not say, “It does not matter whether you want to go or not; you are going. I will just pick you up and set you down there.” He brought to pass certain things that made it possible. He provided transportation; He provided an invitation, and on and on we could go. That is all in the world predestination means.

Whosoever Will May Come

Think of it in that way, and notice the things that He caused to happen to bring to pass their experience. The first thing is in verse 30:

Romans 8

30Moreover whom he did predestinate, them he also called:…

That is the first thing; He called. Somebody becomes terribly disturbed and says, “Well, you see, that is the problem; I believe in predestination and I don't believe I'm called, so there isn't anything I can do. I guess I'll just have to go to Hell.” Beloved, you don't know your Bible if you believe that. You haven't been called? Well, then, I'll call you: “Whosoever will may come and take of the water of life freely” (Revelation 22:17). “Whosoever will may come”; that is the call, and that is all in the world you need. That is all; don't say you have not been called. If you have never been called before, you are called right now. “Whosoever will may come and take of the water of life freely.”

Justification

Notice verse 30:

Romans 8

30Moreover whom he did predestinate, them he also called: and whom he called, them he also justified.

Think with me. It is not difficult for me to understand the call in relation to my own life, because I remember when I answered the call. This word “justified”–I believe it because God's Word says it, but I cannot comprehend it. Do you know what it means? It means that when God called me and I answered the call, he justified me. Do you know what that means? That means that He arranged it so that in His sight I am just as if I had never sinned at all.

You know how it is with your own life. Someone does something against you, and you find it very hard to forgive. There are people who say, “I just can't forgive him; if I go to Hell for it, I can't forgive him.” They find it difficult to forgive. There are other people who know they must forgive, but so often they will add, “But I can't forget it. I will remember it until the day I die.” That is human, but it is not godly. Do you see what God does? He not only forgives, but He forgets it to the extent that I, in His sight, am as though I had never sinned at all. That is what Paul means in Romans, chapter 5, verse 1:

Romans 5

1Therefore being justified by faith, we have peace with God…

That is what gives me peace–to know that every time I come to God in prayer, God is not going to face me with some of the mean things I've done in my life. He will not say, “Joe Temple, what are you talking to me for, you sorry thing; you ought to be ashamed to say a word to Me.” He does not even mention it. You see, I have been justified–called and justified.

Glorification

This next statement is a tremendous thing to me, and truly, I am unable to comprehend it.

Romans 8

30Moreover whom he did predestinate, them he also called: and whom he called, them he also justified: and whom he justified, them he also glorified.

I want to say, “Praise the Lord!” Did you notice the word “glorified”? Now you don't see any halo around my head, and since I have begun to get a little middle-aged weight, you don't see anything on my back that might make you think some wings were growing. But I am glorified, because that is what God's Word says; because He justified me, He glorified me. Actually, I won't have my glorified body until I stand in the presence of my Lord, yet as far as God is concerned, it is settled. Isn't it wonderful to have a God who never quits before the job is finished!

When God Fights for You

Go back with me to Exodus, chapter 15. That was what Moses said:

Exodus 15

13Thou in thy mercy hath led forth the people which thou hast redeemed: thou hast guided them in thy strength unto thy holy habitation.

Remember, only one step on the other side of the Red Sea, but he could see the people throughout all the land of Canaan standing in awe, frightened beyond measure; that is what he says in verse 14:

Exodus 15

14The people shall hear, and be afraid: sorrow shall take hold of the inhabitants of Palestina.
15Then the dukes of Edom shall be amazed; the mighty men of Moab, trembling shall take hold upon them; all the inhabitants of Canaan shall melt away.
16Fear and dread shall fall upon them; by the greatness of thine arm they shall be as still as a stone; till thy people pass over, O LORD, till the people pass over, which thou hast purchased.

Notice what he said: “When we pass through the land of Canaan, full of all kinds of enemies that would be able to mow us down without a bit of effort, they shall be as still as a stone as we march through.” Isn't that tremendous! That is what happens when God fights for you. If you try to do your own fighting, that stone may break your toe before it's over with. Notice verse 17:

Exodus 15

17Thou shalt bring them in, and plant them in the mountain of thine inheritance, in the place, O LORD, which thou hast made for thee to dwell in, in the Sanctuary, O LORD, which thy hands have established.
18The LORD shall reign for ever and ever.

God will bring in.

A Habitation for God

Now notice with me one verse in this song which I have purposely left till last because I trust that through it the Lord will speak to our hearts. It is verse 2 of chapter 15:

Exodus 15

2The LORD is my strength and song, and he is become my salvation: he is my God, and I will prepare him an habitation; my father's God, and I will exalt him.

Have you prepared for the Lord a habitation? What does that mean? Turn with me, please, to the book of Isaiah, chapter 57, and notice in verse 15 a tremendous truth. How it should humble our hearts as we think about it!

Isaiah 57

15For thus saith the high and lofty One that inhabiteth eternity, whose name is Holy; I dwell in the high and holy place [That is not hard for us to understand, is it? We would expect God to dwell in a high and holy place. Notice another place He dwells.] , with him also that is of a contrite and humble spirit, to revive the spirit of the humble, and to revive the heart of the contrite ones.

The Lord, it is true dwells in a high and holy place, but He dwells also with a humble heart. Have you prepared for Him a habitation?

Conclusion

Turn with me, if you will, to chapter 3 of the book of Revelation for one last statement I would like to leave with you:

Revelation 3

20Behold, I stand at the door, and knock: if any man hear my voice, and open the door, I will come in to him, and will sup with him, and he with me.

Have you prepared for Him a habitation? Maybe all you need to do is prepare Him a habitation is to invite Him into your heart; He is ready to come in if you ask Him in. That is true of every unsaved person, but do you know, it becomes true of God's children who are out of fellowship with Him? Have you ever said concerning someone who has become a little unfriendly toward you, a little cool, “He has shut me out.”? What do you mean by that? You mean you don't have any fellowship with him. You do not mean you don't love him any more; he has just shut you out. Sometimes it is possible for the children of God to get so busy that they shut the Lord out. He would like to come back in. Can you say with Moses and the Israelites, “I will prepare for Him a habitation.”?


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