The Purpose of Giving the Law
Dr. Joe Temple

Review

You will remember from our discussion of the book of Exodus that the children of Israel had come to the foot of Mount Sinai and there God had given them, or had begun to give them, what we commonly refer to as the law of Moses, or the Ten Commandments. In chapter 20 the Ten Commandments are listed for us.

We have pointed out to you some general facts that we need to keep in mind in our study of the Ten Commandments, and we want to carry that introductory discussion even further before, the Lord willing, we get into a discussion of the Ten Commandments themselves. Because there is such an extreme position at each end of thought in relation to the Ten Commandments, it is important for us to know exactly what we are talking about.

So, the thing that we have tried to establish with you is that the Ten Commandments are not particularly Jewish. Will you keep that in mind? So often you hear people say, “The Ten Commandments were given to the Jews. They are for the Jews, and they are for no one else.” We showed you from the Word of God how the Ten Commandments were written on the hearts of men long before they were written on tables of stone. Then we showed you how every one of the Ten Commandments, with the exception of the one related to the Sabbath day, is repeated in the New Testament as the outworking of the indwelling Holy Spirit in the life of the believer. We make mention of these things by way of review so that you will not be among the folk who dismiss the Ten Commandments as having absolutely no relationship with people of today.

The Purpose In Giving the Ten Commandments

Having said that by way of review, we would like to try to ask and answer some questions related to the Ten Commandments. The first thing that we would like to ask is, “Why were the Ten Commandments given? What was the purpose in giving the Ten Commandments?”

In order to answer that, we want to approach it from a negative standpoint first, and then go on to a positive standpoint. The negative answer that we wish to give we want you to notice very carefully, because it is probably the most important thing that we will say. It is that the Ten Commandments were not given for the conversion of the human soul. The Ten Commandments were not given for the conversion or the salvation of the sinner. I hope you will get that thoroughly fixed in your mind, because if you do not, you will not be able to understand why the law was given.

If you are familiar with your Bibles, as I make that statement you are probably thinking, “I believe I know a verse that says, 'The law was given for the purpose of converting the soul'.” And you do, because you remember that David said, “The law of the Lord is perfect, converting the soul” (Psalms 19:7). But you need to examine that verse in the light of the context. When you do, you will find that he was not talking about the Ten Commandments; he was talking about the whole Word of God. The Word of God is perfect, converting the soul, not the Ten Commandments themselves.

Salvation Not Dependent Upon Keeping the Law

Now, it is not sufficient for us simply to make the statement that the law was not given for the salvation of the soul, without examining the Word of God relative to it and understanding whether that is what the Word of God actually says. So I would like for you to examine with me some passages of Scripture that will verify what I have just said. Will you turn first, please, to the Acts of the Apostles, chapter 13. Verse 33 at which we are going to look is in the midst of a sermon which Paul preached at Antioch:

Acts 13

38Be it known unto you therefore, men and brethren, that through this man is preached unto you the forgiveness of sins:
39And by him all that believe are justified from all things, from which ye could not be justified by the law of Moses.

You will notice in verse 38 that “the man” is the Lord Jesus Christ, and we are told that by the Lord Jesus Christ all that believe (that is, all that believe in Him) are justified from all things for which they could not be justified by the law of Moses. So let us establish clearly in our minds now that the Lord Jesus Christ can do for you what the law of Moses is unable to do. The law of Moses, the Ten commandments, cannot justify you. It cannot save you. It cannot redeem you. You will find many folk who believe that they must keep the Ten Commandments, and who believe that if they do not keep the Ten Commandments they will wind up in an eternal Hell. We suggest to you now that even if you keep the Ten Commandments (and will you notice “if,” because we are going to show you that that is impossible), even if you keep the Ten Commandments, you still cannot be saved by them. Even if you keep the Ten Commandments, you still cannot be redeemed by them, because the law of Moses, the Ten Commandments, was not given for the purpose of redemption.

No Flesh Justified By Keeping the Law

Will you turn, please, to the book of Galatians, chapter 2, verse 13. Paul is discussing how he had to take his stand for the grace of God as opposed to legalism in relation to salvation:

Galatians 2

13And the other Jews dissembled likewise with him; insomuch that Barnabas also was carried away with their dissimulation.
14But when I saw that they walked not uprightly according to the truth of the gospel, I said unto Peter before them all, If thou, being a Jew, livest after the manner of Gentiles, and not as do the Jews, why compellest thou the Gentiles to live as do the Jews?
15We who are Jews by nature, and not sinners of the Gentiles,

Notice this very carefully:

Listen to this very carefully:

…for by the works of the law shall no flesh be justified.

There it is emphasized for us again that by the works of the law no flesh shall be justified; therefore the Ten Commandments cannot produce the converison of the human soul.

Impossibility of Righteousness By Keeping the Law

Will you turn, please, to chapter 3 of the Galatian letter, and will you notice verse 19:

Galatians 3

19Wherefore then serveth the law? It was added because of transgressions, till the seed should come to whom the promise was made; and it was ordained by angels in the hand of a mediator.
20Now a mediator is not a mediator of one, but God is one.
21Is the law then against the promises of God? God forbid: for if there had been a law given which could have given life, verily righteousness should have been by the law.
22But the scripture hath concluded all under sin, that the promise by faith of Jesus Christ might be given to them that believe.

Notice verse 21 particularly:

Here is a very simple and very plain statement that the law cannot save, for if the law could save, then it would not have been necessary for the Lord Jesus Christ to come. If the Ten Commandments could save, then it would not have been necessary for the Lord Jesus Christ to give His life as a ransom for the sins of the world. In the words of Paul, “If the law could save, then righteousness would have been by the law.”

A Basis for Condemning Sinners

Our first answer, then, to the question “Why were the Ten Commandments given?”, approaching from a negative standpoint, is that the law was not given to produce the conversion of the human soul. The law was not given to provide redemption for sinners. The law was not given in order that men might be save.

Why, then, was the law given? Approaching from a positive standpoint, we are going to suggest to you that the law was given as a basis for condemnation of sinners. Let me say that for you again, so you will be sure to remember it: The law was given to provide a basis for condemnation for sinners. Will you turn with me, please, to the book of Romans, chapter 3, verse 19:

Romans 3

19Now we know that what things soever the law saith, it saith to them who are under the law: that every mouth may be stopped, and all the world may become guilty before God.
20Therefore by the deeds of the law there shall no flesh be justified in his sight: for by the law is the knowledge of sin.

Recognition of Guilt

Will you notice particularly the last statement of verse 19:

Romans 3

19…that every mouth may be stopped, and all the world may become guilty before God.

The last part of verse 20 is closely related to it:

We repeat: The law, the Ten Commandments, was given as a basis for condemnation, so that when men stood before God and proclaimed their own righteousness, all that God would need to do would be to point to a broken law and they would recognize and realize that they were guilty before God; their mouths would be stopped. Will you notice chapter 4 of the book of Romans, verses 14 and 15:

Romans 4

14For if they which are of the law be heirs, faith is made void, and the promise made of none effect:
15Because the law worketh wrath: for where no law is, there is no transgression.

From a positive standpoint, then, the law was given to provide a basis for condemnation. Where there is no law, there is no transgression. The moment there is a transgression of the law of God, the person who transgresses becomes the object of the wrath of Justice. In our ordinary everyday affairs, unless we break a law, we are not due any punishment. But the moment we break any law, at that moment we are due whatever punishment is provided by the wrath of the one who administers the justice. So the law was given for the condemnation of the human race, that the human race might stand with their mouths stopped before God; that nobody in the human race could say, “I have a right to eternal life.” All that God would need to do would be to point to a broken law.

Giving Strength to Sin

Will you turn, please, to I Corinthians, chapter 15. This is the resurrection chapter. But you remember that right at the end of the chapter the resurrection is referred to as a sort of victory over death, and death and sin and the law are all presented in their relationship one to the other. In verse 55 we read:

I Corinthians 15

55O death, where is thy sting? O grave, where is thy victory?
56The sting of death is sin; and the strength of sin is the law.
57But thanks be to God, which giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ.

Notice the statement: “…the strength of sin is the law.” The sin would have no strength to condemn the individual if it were not for the law which declared sin a transgression of the law.

Convicting Man of His Sinfulness

That leads us to the third thing we want to say to you in answer to the question: “Why was the law given?” Keep in mind that negatively it was not given for the conversion of the human soul. Positively, it was given to provide a basis of condemnation, that every mouth might be stopped before God. Third (and this is important from a practical standpoint), it was given that men might be convicted of their sin. It was given that men might realize that they themselves stood condemned before God. This is exceedingly important. I am of the opinion that one of the reasons there seems to be such a disregard of sin, such an unconsciousness of condemnation in relation to sin, is that there has not been enough emphasis placed upon the law in the preaching of the Word of God.

There are extremes in relation to this. Folk don't want to be so legalistic that they have no joy in their salvation, so they tend to go to the other extreme and never mention the obligation of the human soul in relation to God. I want to show you from the Word of God that the law was given to bring men under conviction so that they might sense their need for Christ; for if men do not realize that they are sinners, if they do not realize the hopelessness of their state, they will never turn to the Lord Jesus Christ for salvation. It is only when men recognize that they are utterly, hopelessly lost that they want to trust Christ as Saviour; unless there is the conviction of sin there will not be that desire to trust Christ.

Will you turn again to the book of Romans, chapter 5, and will you notice in verse 20 this simple statement:

Romans 5

20Moreover the law entered, that the offence might abound. But where sin abounded, grace did much more abound:

We thank God for the last part of that 20th verse: “Where sin abounded, grace did much more abound.” Were it not for the last part of the 20th verse, our message would be a hopeless one. But we are primarily interested at the moment in the first part: “Moreover the law entered.” We are asking now, “Why did the law come? Why was the law given?” Keep in mind, given not only to Moses. Moses wrote it down, but it was placed in the hearts of men, you remember, back in chapter 3 of the book of Genesis.

Why did the law enter? Well, here is one answer in verse 20. The law entered that the offense might abound. That is, the law entered that men might realize how sinful they were. The law entered that men might realize how they had they offended a Holy God. You say, “Well, now, suppose somebody did not have the Bible; suppose somebody did not have the Ten Commandments; how would they know?” As we pointed out to you last week, men have the law of God written in their hearts. They have the law of God written in their hearts so that when they steal, they are convicted that it is wrong, Although they may not know exactly why and how, the law of God is written in their hearts.

Effect On a Christian Out of Fellowship

Will you turn to chapter 7 of the book of Romans, please, and notice Paul's testimony concerning the purpose of the law. Keep in mind, so you will not be led astray in your interpretation of the book of Romans, that Paul is talking as a saved person here. But he is talking as a person who is aware of his sinful nature; a person who is living out of fellowship with the Lord although he is a Christian, will have as difficult a time as a person who has never been born again. We are interested in what Paul has to say about how the law affected him. Will you notice verse 7:

Romans 7

7What shall we say then? Is the law sin? God forbid. Nay, I had not known sin, but by the law: for I had not known lust, except the law had said, Thou shalt not covet.
8But sin, taking occasion by the commandment, wrought in me all manner of concupiscence. For without the law sin was dead.
9For I was alive without the law once: but when the commandment came, sin revived, and I died.
10And the commandment, which was ordained to life, I found to be unto death.
11For sin, taking occasion by the commandment, deceived me, and by it slew me.
12Wherefore the law is holy, and the commandment holy, and just, and good.
13Was then that which is good made death unto me? God forbid. But sin, that it might appear sin, working death in me by that which is good; that sin by the commandment might become exceeding sinful.

Here is Paul's testimony as to the purpose of the law; the purpose of the law is to emphasize to men the exceeding sinfulness of sin. It was not meant to save. It was meant to convict.

Bringing Us Unto Christ

Now, will you go with me again to the book of Galatians, chapter 3, verse 22:

Galatians 3

22But the scripture hath concluded all under sin, that the promise by faith of Jesus Christ might be given to them that believe.
23But before faith came, we were kept under the law, shut up unto the faith which should afterwards be revealed.
24Wherefore the law was our schoolmaster to bring us unto Christ, that we might be justified by faith.
25But after that faith is come, we are no longer under a schoolmaster.
26For ye are all the children of God by faith in Christ Jesus.
27For as many of you as have been baptized into Christ have put on Christ.
28There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither bond nor free, there is neither male nor female: for ye are all one in Christ Jesus.
29And if ye be Christ's, then are ye Abraham's seed, and heirs according to the promise.

Notice verse 24:

A schoolmaster as described in Galatians is not the same thing as a school teacher today. A schoolmaster, as Paul described him here in the book of Galatians, was a sort of tutor or governor to whom the individual child in the family was committed until he reached the age of maturity. The child was under the jurisdiction of that schoolmaster with the idea that he would be prepared for his freedom when he reached the age of maturity.

Paul tells here in the Galatian letter that the law was given that our hearts might be prepared for the acceptance of Jesus Christ. If we were not convicted that we were sinners, utterly lost and undone, we would not turn to the Lord Jesus Christ. So the law was given, first of all, not for the purpose of conversion; it was given to provide the basis of condemnation for the human race. It was given to convict men of their need of Christ–first, by emphasizing the exceeding sinfulness of sin, and then by means of the very law itself emphasizing to man his utter inability to be saved by the keeping of the law.

Why Man Cannot Keep the Law

Someone says, “You mean that–that you cannot be saved by keeping the law?” We meant that. “Well, suppose, just for the sake of discussion,” someone says, “that a person should keep the law; couldn't he be saved by the keeping of the law?” Well, the hypothetical case which you suggest is absurd because no one has ever kept the law and no one will ever be able to keep the law. There are two reason for that, and I would like for you to notice them now with me. Perhaps we could say that there is one reason with two points involved in it.

Weakness of the Flesh

Will you turn with me first to chapter 8 of the book of Romans, so that you may notice with me one reason why we say it is impossible for man to keep the law. Will you notice verse 3:

Romans 8

3For what the law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and for sin, condemned sin in the flesh:
4That the righteousness of the law might be fulfilled in us, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit.

Notice verse 3 particularly: “For what the law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh.” This might be clearer if we read it, “For what the law could not do because of the weakness of the flesh.” The law was not weak. As we have noticed several times over in our reading of the Scripture, the law was perfect and just and good. There was not one thing wrong with the law. But the law could not be kept because of the weakness of the flesh. What do we mean by the weakness of the flesh? Well, glance at chapter 7, verse 14, and let Paul tell you what he means when he is talking about the weakness of the flesh:

Romans 7

14For we know that the law is spiritual: but I am carnal, [that is I am fleshly] sold under sin.

Now notice

In other words, that is the weakness of the flesh. “To will? Oh, I want to. but how to do it? That is beyond me,” and he explains in verse 19:

More Than a Lack of Will Power

The weakness of the flesh is seen in the utter inability to do the righteousness of the law. Will you keep in mind that it is more than a physical weakness. It is more than a lack of self–control. It is more than a lack of will power. How many times have people said, “A man can do anything he makes up his mind to do. All he needs is some will power.” That is not true. It is true that we are different. It is true that some of us have more stamina than others. It is true that some of us may be able to say, “I will not do a thing,” and we won't. But every member of Adam's race lacks this thing that I am speaking about which makes possible the keeping of the law.

Will you glance at chapter 8, verse 7, for the reason why I say it goes deeper than what we ordinarily call will power and self–control:

Romans 8

7Because the carnal mind is enmity against God: for it is not subject to the law of God, neither indeed can be.

Substitute the word “flesh” for the word “carnal,” because it is the same word, and then look at verse 8:

It is absolutely impossible for an unregenerated human being to provide righteousness by the law, because the flesh is not subject to the law of God, neither indeed can it be. But you know there are always die-hards everywhere, and the Spirit of God knew there would be, so He gives us yet another passage of Scripture that should silence every mouth. Will you turn, please, to the book of James. There are folk who say, “Well, perhaps so and so can't do that, but I am not like him. I am not going to say I am like someone who doesn't keep the law. I believe I do pretty good. I believe I would be willing to measure my life alongside of somebody's else,” etc. etc. Notice James, chapter 2, verse 8:

James 2

8If ye fulfil the royal law according to the scripture, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself, ye do well:

Respect of Persons

“Well, good,” somebody says, “I do that. I love my neighbor as I do myself.” Do you?

James 2

9But if ye have respect to persons, ye commit sin, and are convinced [convicted] of the law as transgressors.

Do you show some people a little more esteem than you do other people? Do you treat everybody exactly alike? Do you say concerning some folk, “Oh, it doesn't matter about him. Don't bother getting dressed up for him. It doesn't matter.” But about somebody else, do you say, “Well, now wait a minute. He mustn't catch us like this.” Now, why? You show respect of persons, and God said, “If you do, you are convicted of the law as a transgressor.”

Offend In One Point

Look at verse 10:

James 2

10For whosoever shall keep the whole law, and yet offend in one point, he is guilty of all.

Oh, I may take a great deal of comfort in the fact that I have never murdered anybody. “Thou shalt not kill”; I can look at the commandment and feel real good. But when I read what the Lord Jesus Christ said about the fulfillment of the law, I don't feel so good. Because, though by the grace of God I have never killed anybody, I have been mad enough to, and it is by the grace of God I didn't do it. Maybe once or twice, if my aim had been a little better, I would have. You see what I am talking about? Notice verse 11:

James 2

11For he that said, Do not commit adultery, said also, Do not kill. Now if thou commit no adultery, yet if thou kill, thou art become a transgressor of the law.

You read one of the laws, and you say, “Good, I have kept that.” But keep on. Even if you have kept all but one, God says you are guilty in His sight of breaking every single one of them.

Now, can anybody be saved by the law? In the light of the weakness of the flesh and in the light of the tremendous demands which the law makes upon us, we would say to you that the law (now, listen carefully to what I am going to say) the law was not meant to be kept. It was meant to show you the utter impossibility of keeping it and producing righteousness thereby.

Questions

Before we leave this discussion, I would like to answer some questions which commonly arise because of the statements I have just made. You know, sometimes after I have given a lesson I have to answer questions because of the statements I have made. I have to depend upon the Holy Spirit for the answers I give, of course, but I am not always able to say, “Thus saith the Lord,” in relation to them. When I can't, I have to tell you so; I have to say, “Well, this is the way I see it.” But about these questions which I am going to suggest, the Holy Spirit knew they would arise, so He let somebody answer them. All I need to do is to direct your attention to the answers.

Is the Law Any Good?

The first question that is often asked in view of what I have said to you is, “Is the law any good at all? If what you say is true, we may as well throw the whole thing out the window; it is not worth anything at all.” Will you turn, please, to the book of Romans, chapter 7, verse 7:

Romans 7

7What shall we say then? Is the law sin?…

Is is bad? Is it worthless? “What shall we say then? Is the law sin?” In verse 13 of this same chapter:

Romans 7

13Was then that which is good made death unto me?…

Is a good thing like the law accursed to me? Is it worthless? Notice the answer which Paul gives to both questions. In verse 7, he says, “God forbid.” In verse 13 he says, “God forbid.”

If you were reading this in the original text, you would not find a word for “God.” Nor would you find a word for the word “forbid.” The translators put it that way because it was the strongest thing that to their minds could express the untranslatable phrase. some folk might say, “Perish the thought. Don't even suggest such a thing. The very idea that anybody would suggest that the law is worthless. The very idea that anybody would suggest that the law is wrong.” Paul goes on to tell us, as we have already noticed, “Nay, I had not known sin but by the law.”

Effect of Being Free From the Law

If you will turn to chapter 6 of the book of Romans, I will suggest another question which is often asked, and it is: “If the law is not binding upon us, if the law is not for us in relation to righteousness and in relation to salvation, if we are free from the law, won't we become lawless? Won't we do just anything we want to do?” I have been told any number of times when I have emphasized truth related to the grace of God, “That is wonderful, but don't you think it is dangerous? Don't you think that if you tell people they don't have to keep the Ten Commandments, it is a dangerous thing?” Well, Paul had to face the same thing, and in chapter 6 of the letter to the Romans he said in verse 1:

Romans 6

1What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin, that grace may abound?

Here is our phrase: “God forbid. Perish the thought. Don't even mention such a thing.”

You see, they were saying, “Why Paul, the way you are talking, the first thing you know people will do just what they want to do; they will continue in sin, they won't have any rule, any regulation, anything to keep them in line.” Paul said, “Don't talk like that. How can a born-again Christian, how can an individual who knows the Lord, how can an individual who is dead to sin, live any longer therein?” If you take the Ten Commandments away from unsaved people, they might feel there is no longer any restraint, and they might do exactly what they want to do. But a born-again Christian should not need the restraint of Moses' law. A born-again person should be dead to sin, as we have already suggested to you.

Those two questions, “Is the law worthless?” and “Will it not be something that will remove all restraint?”, are answered by the Word of God itself. Someone says, “Well, in spite of everything that has been said, I am not so sure that the law has no more jurisdiction over us. ” Before we answer that question, we are going to have to understand what we are talking about. So often we may be talking about the same thing, but we are using different phraseology and getting farther apart all the time.

Free From the Law of Moses

First, let me say to you that we are free from the law of Moses. How do I know that? Look again at chapter 7 of the letter to the Romans, the first 6 verses. There are so many passages of Scripture at which we might look, but this one seems to me to be so very clear:

Romans 7

1Know ye not, brethren, (for I speak to them that know the law,) how that the law hath dominion over a man as long as he liveth?

This is not the law of Moses. This is simply laws related to a society of people.

“Well, now,” you say, “that is the law of Moses.” No, it is the law of God. God gave that law in chapter 3 of the book of Genesis, and Moses reiterated it (Exodus 24:4)

Romans 7

2For the woman which hath an husband is bound by the law to her husband so long as he liveth; but if the husband be dead, she is loosed from the law of her husband.
3So then if, while her husband liveth, she be married to another man, she shall be called an adulteress: but if her husband be dead, she is free from that law; so that she is no adulteress, though she be married to another man.

Here is a simple illustration that we all understand. Now, the point in verse 4:

Romans 7

4Wherefore, my brethren, ye also are become dead to the law by the body of Christ; that ye should be married to another, even to him who is raised from the dead, that we should bring forth fruit unto God.
5For when we were in the flesh, the motions of sins, which were by the law,……

That is what we have been talking about all this time: the exceeding sinfulness of sin.

Romans 7

5…….. did work in our members to bring forth fruit unto death.
6But now we are delivered from the law, that being dead wherein we were held; that we should serve in newness of spirit, and not in the oldness of the letter.

The Law of the Spirit of Life

When the Lord Jesus Christ died, we were set free from the law, just as a woman is set free from her marriage vows when her husband dies. Individuals today who are trying to serve in the oldness of the letter, instead of the newness of the Spirit, are missing the real joy of their relationship to the Lord. Will you notice chapter 8 of the book of Romans:

Romans 8

1There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit.

Notice verse 2

What is it? No law for Christians? Nobody said there isn't any law for the Christian. All we said was that the law of Moses does not apply to the Christians. You notice in verse 2:

Romans 8

2For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus hath made me free from the law of sin and death.

The law of sin and death is the law of Moses, but the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus supersedes the law of Moses. In our law books today often one law is changed by the passing of another law. If the law is on the statute books, you don't just say, “Well, I don't like it, so I am not going to keep it.” There has to be a change made, or you are still responsible under the old law.

Well, thank God the change was made when the Lord Jesus Christ died. “Oh,” somebody says, “then we live in a state of anarchy. No law,” Oh, no. That is wrong It is not the law of Moses. It is the law of the Spirit of life.

Testimony of the Apostle Paul

One other verse would I give you along this line. Will you turn, please, to I Corinthians, chapter 9, verse 19, for the testimony of the Apostle Paul:

I Corinthians 9

19For though I be free from all men, yet have I made myself servant unto all, that I might gain the more.
20And unto the Jews I became as a Jew, that I might gain the Jews; to them that are under the law, as under the law, that I might gain them that are under the law;
21To them that are without law, as without law, (being not without law to God, but under the law to Christ,) that I might gain them that are without law.

Do you notice what he says? He tries to put himself in the place of all men in various walks of life and in various approaches, so that he might be able to witness more effectively to them. This is not compromise. He is not saying here that he compromises his testimony. He is simply saying, that when he is dealing with a Jew, he draws upon those experiences in his life when he was under the law, that they might have a common ground of discussion. But when he is talking to the Gentiles, who know nothing about the law as the Jews know it, to them who are without the law, he speaks and acts accordingly. But, lest there be any misunderstanding, notice what he puts in parenthesis in verse 20. “Being not without law to God.” “Now, don't jump to conclusions,” he says. “When I use the phrase, 'as without the law,' I am not talking about being without law to God. I am talking about being under the law of Christ. I am not talking about a person who lives lawlessly; I am talking about a person who has changed the bondage of the law of Moses, which worketh death, for the love bondage of the law of Christ, which worketh life.”

Prayer

Shall we bow our heads together for prayer:

We thank Thee, our Father, that what we were not able to accomplish in relation to the Ten Commandments because of the weakness of our flesh, the Lord Jesus Christ did when He came to this earth. We thank Thee, our Father, that although we are not under the law of Moses, we are willing love-slaves of the Lord Jesus Christ. Grant, our Father, we pray Thee, that we may enjoy the liberty that we have in Christ. For we pray in Jesus' name, and for His sake. Amen.


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