Christ - Our Mediator
Dr. Joe Temple

Ten Commandments Related to the Cross

Will you open your Bibles, please, to the book of Exodus. We have been thinking together about the Ten Commandments; we want now to think about the Commandments as they are related to the Cross.

Shall we bow our heads together for prayer:

We do thank Thee, our Father, that we have this opportunity of looking into the Word of God, and we do pray that Thou wouldst open the Word to us. We pray that we will be able to learn from our reading of the Word that which will encourage our hearts and remind us that our salvation lies in Christ. For we pray in Jesus' name and for His sake. Amen.

A very significant thing will appear to you if you will take the time to search out the Word of God: The Commandments are never mentioned without being related to the Cross, or the values of the Cross, of Christ. The reason for that will become evident as we look at the last paragraph of Exodus, chapter 20, and then notice together some related Scriptures:

Exodus 20

18And all the people saw the thunderings, and the lightnings, and the noise of the trumpet, and the mountain smoking: and when the people saw it, they removed, and stood afar off.
19And they said unto Moses, Speak thou with us, and we will hear: but let not God speak with us, lest we die.
20And Moses said unto the people, Fear not: for God is come to prove you, and that his fear may be before your faces, that ye sin not.
21And the people stood afar off, and Moses drew near unto the thick darkness where God was.
22And the LORD said unto Moses, Thus thou shalt say unto the children of Israel, Ye have seen that I have talked with you from heaven.
23Ye shall not make with me gods of silver, neither shall ye make unto you gods of gold.
24An altar of earth thou shalt make unto me, and shalt sacrifice thereon thy burnt offerings, and thy peace offerings, thy sheep, and thine oxen: in all places where I record my name I will come unto thee, and I will bless thee.
25And if thou wilt make me an altar of stone, thou shalt not build it of hewn stone: for if thou lift up thy tool upon it, thou hast polluted it.
26Neither shalt thou go up by steps unto mine altar, that thy nakedness be not discovered thereon.

Condemned By the Commandments

These verses of Scripture, we emphasize, relate the altar, which is the Old Testament symbol of the Cross, to the Commandments, for a very definite reason: No sincere soul can meditate upon the Ten Commandments and everything the Ten Commandments involve without feeling thoroughly undone, without feeling definitely condemned, without feeling as if there is no chance of salvation for him. That is exactly how these Israelites felt. Look at verse 18 again:

Exodus 20

18And all the people saw the thunderings, and the lightnings, and the noise of the trumpet, and the mountain smoking: and when the people saw it, they removed, and stood afar off.
19[Because they were afraid] they said unto Moses, Speak thou with us, and we will hear: but let not God speak with us, lest we die.

Their hearts were so filled with fear at their consciousness of sin that they felt the need that any sensible person feels when he is undone before God; they felt the need of a mediator. They felt the need of somebody to stand between them and God.

Comparison and Contrast

They did not always feel that way. Glance back at chapter 19 and refresh your minds about some of the things that occurred before the Ten Commandments were given. We looked at this earlier, but I think that for comparison and contrast it would be wise to look at it again. So, will you notice verse 1 of Exodus, chapter 19:

Exodus 19

1In the third month, when the children of Israel were gone forth out of the land of Egypt, the same day came they into the wilderness of Sinai.
2For they were departed from Rephidim, and were come to the desert of Sinai, and had pitched in the wilderness; and there Israel camped before the mount [This is a simple, geographical explanation. The children of Israel had come to the foot of Mt. Sinai, where God gave the Ten Commandments to Moses.] .
3And Moses went up unto God, and the LORD called unto him out of the mountain, saying, Thus shalt thou say to the house of Jacob, and tell the children of Israel;
4Ye have seen what I did unto the Egyptians, and how I bare you on eagles' wings, and brought you unto myself.
5Now therefore, if ye will obey my voice indeed, and keep my covenant, then ye shall be a peculiar treasure unto me above all people: for all the earth is mine:
6And ye shall be unto me a kingdom of priests, and an holy nation. These are the words which thou shalt speak unto the children of Israel.

Let's stop for a moment and think about what we have read. Moses went up into the mountain, and God said to Moses, “Moses, I am going to give you a covenant (which we find later is the Ten Commandments), and I want you to tell the children of Israel that if they will obey Me, if they will keep this covenant, they will be a peculiar treasure to Me. They will be a people that is especially My own; they will be a kingdom of priest and an holy nation. You tell them what I said.” And in verse 7:

Exodus 19

7And Moses came and called for the elders of the people, and laid before their faces all these words which the LORD commanded him.
8[Notice this next verse; it is very important] And all the people answered together, and said, All that the LORD hath spoken we will do. And Moses returned the words of the people unto the LORD.

Understanding the Ten Commandments

The rest of the chapter describes how, in a thick cloud, with fire, thunder, and lightning, God gave the covenant, or the Ten Commandments, to Moses. Are you thinking with me? Before they knew what the Ten Commandments were, they said, “Sure, we will do anything You ask us to do. We will be glad to do it. If you want us to obey You, we will obey You.” It would be a snap. There wouldn't be anything to it. “Just let us know and we will do it.” That was before they knew what the covenant was.

After the Ten Commandments were given in detail, you will remember they backed off as far from that mountain as they could, and they said, “Moses, don't let God say anything else to us. We are scared Why, we haven't got a chance. If that is what God expects of us, if that is what God demands of us, we haven't got a chance. Don't let God talk to us. You talk to God and then you talk to us, and we will talk to you and you talk to God, but we can't talk directly to Him. We are too unworthy. We are too undone. We are too frightened.” Any honestly-thinking man who considers these Ten Commandments and analyzes the feelings of the Israelites who heard them first hand, is a very foolish man if he does not feel condemned in the light of these Commandments, and if he does not feel that he very definitely has the need of somebody to stand between him and God.

The Need for a Mediator

Will you turn, please, to the book of Deuteronomy, chapter 5. This chapter is a recounting of the Ten Commandments and of the manner in which they were given. Moses is reminding the children of Israel of how the Ten Commandments were given, and in so doing he presents some information that is not included in chapter 20 of the book of Exodus. Notice chapter 5, verse 1:

Deuteronomy 5

1And Moses called all Israel, and said unto them, Hear, O Israel, the statutes and judgments which I speak in your ears this day, that ye may learn them, and keep, and do them.
2The LORD our God made a covenant with us in Horeb [the word ”Horeb” is just another name for Sinai, the place where the Commandments were given] .
3The LORD made not this covenant with our fathers, but with us, even us, who are all of us here alive this day.
4The LORD talked with you face to face in the mount out of the midst of the fire,
5[Then he injects a parenthetical statement by way of explanation:] (I stood between the LORD and you at that time, to shew you the word of the LORD: for ye were afraid by reason of the fire, and went not up into the mount;) saying,
6[Then he continues what God said to them that day:] I am the LORD thy God, which brought thee out of the land of Egypt, from the house of bondage.
7Thou shalt have none other gods before me.

He lists the Ten Commandments as we find them in chapter 20 of the book of Exodus. Then in verse 22:

Deuteronomy 5

22These words the LORD spake unto all your assembly in the mount out of the midst of the fire, of the cloud, and of the thick darkness, with a great voice: and he added no more. And he wrote them in two tables of stone, and delivered them unto me.
23And it came to pass, when ye heard the voice out of the midst of the darkness, (for the mountain did burn with fire,) that ye came near unto me, even all the heads of your tribes, and your elders;
24And ye said, Behold, the LORD our God hath shewed us his glory and his greatness, and we have heard his voice out of the midst of the fire: we have seen this day that God doth talk with man, and he liveth.
25Now therefore why should we die? for this great fire will consume us: if we hear the voice of the LORD our God any more, then we shall die.
26For who is there of all flesh, that hath heard the voice of the living God speaking out of the midst of the fire, as we have, and lived?
27Go thou near, and hear all that the LORD our God shall say: and speak thou unto us all that the LORD our God shall speak unto thee; and we will hear it, and do it.

This is practically what we read in Exodus, chapter 20, but with a few additional details. The people of Israel, when they heard the Commandments given and recognized the holiness of God, sensed their unworthiness and begged for a mediator. They begged for someone who could stand between them and God. They said, “If we, in all of our impurities, don't find someone who can stand between us and God, in all of His holiness, we will surely die. We have got to have a go-between.”

The Unworthiness of Man

Let us digress for a moment, although it is not actually a digression, and remind you that what we have been reading is repeated over and over again in the Word of God. There is never an instance when man got a full view of God that he did not recognize his own unworthiness. Any time you hear a person talking about how good he is, any time you hear a person talking about how spiritual he is, any time you hear a person talking about how righteous he is, you mark it down in your little book that he has not been very close to God, because any individual who gets a glimpse of God is conscious of his own unworthiness.

Look at verse 28. This is really the reason why we turned to this chapter, because here Moses tells us what God said when He heard what these people said. You see, these people said, “You go back and tell God we want somebody to stand between us.” Exodus 20 does not tell us what God said, but Deuteronomy 5 does.

Deuteronomy 5

28And the LORD heard the voice of your words, when ye spake unto me; and the LORD said unto me, I have heard the voice of the words of this people, which they have spoken unto thee: they have well said all that they have spoken.

The Condition of the Human Heart

You see what God said about them? “I am glad they want a mediator. I am glad they want somebody to stand between Me and them. I am glad they have that much enlightenment about the need.” The next verse expressed the deep desire of God concerning every one of us, regardless of the Age in which we live, and it also represents a commentary on the condition of the human heart:

Deuteronomy 5

29O that there were such an heart in them, that they would fear me, and keep all my commandments always, that it might be well with them, and with their children for ever!

“Oh, I wish,” God said, “I wish they had a heart that would do everything that I want them to do. But they don't have a heart like that.” You don't, either. The Bible says about your heart what is said about their heart and what it says about mine. It is that your heart is deceitful and desperately wicked, and no man is capable of fully understanding it or knowing it (Jeremiah 17:9). That is why you have to have a mediator. That is why you have to have a go-between. That is why you have to have somebody to stand between you and God.

God's Promise of a Mediator

Will you turn now to chapter 18 of the book of Deuteronomy, because here we have an addition to this conversation that we did not find in Exodus 20 and that we did not find in Deuteronomy 5. You say, “Why is that?” Well, after all, the Word of God, although it is inspired, is the record of the conversations as they were actually held. Have you not sometimes spoken about an occurrence several times? When you speak about it the second time, maybe somebody will say, “You didn't tell that before.” and you didn't. It wasn't that it didn't happen but you enlarged on the story because that particular thing came to mind. Maybe you tell it the third time, and someone says, “I have heard you tell that twice, and you never did tell that.” Well, no, you didn't It wasn't that it was not true; it was just that you had not included that particular detail. I say reverently that this is the case here. Notice verse 15:

Deuteronomy 18

15The LORD thy God will raise up unto thee a Prophet from the midst of thee, of thy brethren, like unto me; unto him ye shall hearken;
16According to all that thou desiredst of the LORD thy God in Horeb in the day of the assembly, saying, Let me not hear again the voice of the LORD my God, neither let me see this great fire any more, that I die not.
17And the LORD said unto me, They have well spoken that which they have spoken.
18I will raise them up a Prophet from among their brethren, like unto thee, and will put my words in his mouth; and he shall speak unto them all that I shall command him.
19And it shall come to pass, that whosoever will not hearken unto my words which he shall speak in my name, I will require it of him.

You realize what we have been reading? Moses said, “You know, when you people said, 'We want somebody to stand between us; we want a go-between; we want a mediator,' God said, 'I like to hear you say that. So, I will tell you what I am going to do. Sometime in the future I am going to raise a Prophet who will stand between the whole human race and Me just as Moses has stood between Israel and me. I am going to raise up a Prophet like unto Moses.'”

An Expectant Hope

From the day when God said that, down to what we generally refer to as New Testament days, that was an expectant hope in the heart of every person who knew God.

Will you turn with me, please, to the Gospel of John, chapter 1, to see an illustration of what I am thinking about along this line. In this chapter we find a description of the ministry of John the Baptist, of how some of the folk felt about him, of how they wondered who he was. Notice verse 19:

John 1

19And this is the record of John, when the Jews sent priests and Levites from Jerusalem to ask him, Who art thou?
20And he confessed, and denied not; but confessed, I am not the Christ.
21And they asked him, What then? Art thou Elias [Elijah] ? And he saith, I am not. Art thou that prophet? And he answered, No.
22Then said they unto him, Who art thou? that we may give an answer to them that sent us. What sayest thou of thyself?
23He said, I am the voice of one crying in the wilderness, Make straight the way of the Lord, as said the prophet Esaias [Isaiah] .

Do you get the picture? They knew that John was an unusual person. They did not understand everything about him, and they said, “Do you suppose he could be that Prophet?” No informed Israelites would answer, “What are you talking about, 'that Prophet'? Whom do you mean?” Everyone knew whom they meant. They were looking for that Prophet who was to stand some day between God and the whole world as Moses had stood between God and Israel.

Look at chapter 6 of the Gospel of John, verse 14, for further emphasis of the fact that what we are saying is true–that this thought occupied the minds of men. In verse 13, after the miracle of the feeding of the multitudes with five barley loaves and two small fishes was performed, they gathered up 12 baskets of the fragments that remained over and above what they had eaten. That was a tremendous miracle. Then, in verse 14:

John 6

14Then those men, when they had seen the miracle that Jesus did, said, This is of a truth that prophet that should come into the world.

When they saw Jesus Christ perform this miracle, people said, “Who is He?” “Why,” others said, “He is that Prophet–that Prophet that God told Moses would come into the world some day to stand between a sinful world and a holy God.”

Turn, please, to the Acts of the Apostles, chapter 3, and you will see the climax to what I have suggested thus far. We will begin to read with verse 19. This is a sermon which Peter preached long after the day when God gave this promise to Moses, and after the Lord Jesus Christ had come, had been crucified, had been raised again from the dead, and had ascended back to Heaven to sit on the right hand of God:

Acts 3

19Repent ye therefore, and be converted, that your sins may be blotted out, when the times of refreshing shall come from the presence of the Lord.
20And he shall send Jesus Christ, which before was preached unto you:
21Whom the heaven must receive until the times of restitution of all things, which God hath spoken by the mouth of all his holy prophets since the world began.
22For Moses truly said unto the fathers, A prophet shall the Lord your God raise up unto you of your brethren, like unto me; him shall ye hear in all things whatsoever he shall say unto you.
23And it shall come to pass, that every soul, which will not hear that prophet, shall be destroyed from among the people.
24Yea, and all the prophets from Samuel and those that follow after, as many as have spoken, have likewise foretold of these days.

The Mediator Identified

Here was Peter addressing a group of people who were conscious of their sins, and he said, “Repent ye, therefore, and be converted, that your sins may be blotted out.” He went on to say, “The One you need to turn to is the One that Moses spoke about: the Prophet who would be raised up like unto your brethren, the Prophet whom all men should hear.” He identified the Prophet with the Lord Jesus Christ beyond all question. So you see the Mediator the children of Israel thought they needed was none other than the Lord Jesus Christ.

Should there be any doubt in your mind about that, may I suggest that you turn to Paul's first letter to Timothy and notice in chapter 2 a statement which should settle once and for all any suggestion that any other than the Lord Jesus Christ is the Mediator whom each one of us needs. He stands between us and God:

I Timothy 2

1I exhort therefore, that, first of all, supplications, prayers, intercessions, and giving of thanks, be made for all men;
2For kings, and for all that are in authority; that we may lead a quiet and peaceable life in all godliness and honesty.
3For this is good and acceptable in the sight of God our Saviour;
4Who will have all men to be saved, and to come unto the knowledge of the truth.
5[Notice verse 5:] For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus;
6Who gave himself a ransom for all, to be testified in due time.

You see what Paul is saying? He is saying to Timothy, “Our main interest in life should be maintaing those conditions that will enable us to get the message of the Gospel out to the whole world, because there is only one message. That message is that the Lord Jesus Christ is the only Mediator, the only go-between God and man.” If people don't find that out, they have no way to approach God. If people don't find that out, they don't have any way to get in touch with God. The only go-between is Jesus Christ. That is what the Word of God says. That is what the Law declares.

The Law Our Schoolmaster

Will you turn with me, please, to the book of Galatians. You should be able to recognize the purpose of the Law–the reason why the Ten commandments were given; we have been touching on that ever since we began our discussion. It is all summed up in Galatians, chapter 3, verse 24:

Galatians 3

24Wherefore the law [that is the Ten Commandments] was our schoolmaster to bring us unto Christ, that we might be justified by faith.

The Law was our schoolmaster to bring us into a conscious need of a mediator, into a conscious need of Christ. You see how inseparably related the Law is with the Cross, how inseparably related the Ten Commandments are with Christ. You cannot have one without the other. If you take the Commandments by themselves, you are as good as dead, for they sentence you to death. But if you recognize that on the Cross the Lord Jesus Christ fulfilled the demands of those Commandments, you live.

The Safe Approach to God

Let us go back to Exodus, chapter 20, because we want you to see how provision was made for the Cross in relation to the Commandments. Keep in mind that in verse 19 the people had expressed their need of a Mediator. They had recognized their utter incapability of keeping the Ten Commandments. They knew that they were under the sentence of death. They realized that if they had to face God in this condition they would die. God knew it, so He made the provision beginning with verse 22:

Exodus 20

22And the LORD said unto Moses, Thus thou shalt say unto the children of Israel, Ye have seen that I have talked with you from heaven.
23Ye shall not make with me gods of silver, neither shall ye make unto you gods of gold.

Keep in mind what we are talking about: the safe approach to God, the only way that is safe to get in touch with God. The first thing He suggested is from a negative standpoint. He said, “Don't try to do it with silver idols and gold idols. Don't make images of gold and silver and put them on the same level with Me and say you are going to get in touch with Me that way. That is not the way to do it.”

Exodus 20

24An altar of earth thou shalt make unto me, and shalt sacrifice thereon thy burnt offerings, and thy peace offerings, thy sheep, and thine oxen: in all places where I record my name I will come unto thee, and I will bless thee.

“The only way to get in touch with Me is through an altar upon which there is a sacrifice”; that is what God said. “The only way to get in touch with Me is through the sacrifice on the altar.” He even mentioned in verse 25 that that altar has to have absolutely nothing to do with human effort. If it does, God cannot accept the sacrifice:

Exodus 20

25And if thou wilt make me an altar of stone, thou shalt not build it of hewn stone: for if thou lift up thy tool upon it, thou hast polluted it.

The Uselessness of Human Effort

He said, “You can make it out of earth if you want to, but if you make it out of stone, be sure that you don't make it out of hewn stone, for if you lift up your tool upon it, you have polluted it.” That does not sound very good for the human race, does it? It does not sound as if anybody can add anything for his salvation, does it? It does not sound as if anybody's effort to obtain salvation for himself in his own strength is of the slightest value, does it? He said, “It has got to be an altar. Make it out of earth if you want to. But if you make it out of stone, don't you decide you want to make it pretty. Don't you decide you want to do a little chiseling and a little sanding and a little smoothing so you will have a nice, pretty altar. If you do that, you have ruined it. It you do that, you have polluted it. If you do that, you have added your effort, and I cannot accept it.” In verse 26 He adds something else:

Exodus 20

26Neither shalt thou go up by steps unto mine altar, that thy nakedness be not discovered thereon.

You cannot even have steps, because steps are a symbol of man's efforts to ascend, and there cannot be anything about this altar that would bear evidence of human effort. It has to be all of grace, all of sacrifice; it cannot be otherwise.

The Blood of the Covenant

Will you turn to chapter 24 of the book of Exodus, that we may notice how Moses built just such an altar as this after he was through discussing the Commandments in full. In chapter 20 the Ten Commandments are given, and in chapters 21, 22, and 23 those Commandments are elaborated upon, explained, and amplified, so there can be no mistake in the mind of anyone as to what God actually meant. We will bypass those chapters for the moment; for the moment we want to follow this theme of the altar in relation to the Commandments:

Exodus 24

1And he said unto Moses, [that is, God said unto Moses] Come up unto the LORD, thou, and Aaron, Nadab, and Abihu, and seventy of the elders of Israel; and worship ye afar off.
2And Moses alone shall come near the LORD: but they shall not come nigh; neither shall the people go up with him.
3And Moses came and told the people all the words of the LORD, and all the judgments: and all the people answered with one voice, and said, All the words which the LORD hath said will we do.
4And Moses wrote all the words of the LORD, [notice carefully now] and rose up early in the morning, and builded an altar under the hill, and twelve pillars, according to the twelve tribes of Israel.
5And he sent young men of the children of Israel, which offered burnt offerings, and sacrificed peace offerings of oxen unto the LORD.
6And Moses took half of the blood, and put it in basons; and half of the blood he sprinkled on the altar.
7And he took the book of the covenant, and read in the audience of the people: and they said, All that the LORD hath said will we do, and be obedient.
8And Moses took the blood, and sprinkled it on the people, and said, Behold the blood of the covenant, which the LORD hath made with you concerning all these words.

In chapter 20 God said, “Moses, build an altar. Get ready to make a sacrifice, because these people who are condemned by the Law can never come into my presence in their present state. There has to be a sacrifice.” So, in Exodus 24 we find Moses building the altar, identifying it particularly with the nation of Israel because it was that group with whom he was dealing. Then you will notice that he took the various animals designated for sacrifice and slew them there on the altar. Then he took the blood and sprinkled some of it on the altar, some of it on the people, and some of it on the book of the Covenant (Hebrews 9:19), indicating that blood is absolutely essential to meet the demands of God. “Well,” you say, “we are not offering animal sacrifices today. Surely nobody would do a thing like that.” That's right; there is no need for animal sacrifices today. They were but a preview of the complete sacrifice. They were but a picture of a sacrifice that was finished.

Jesus the Finished Sacrifice

How do we know that? We have told you repeatedly that the best commentary

on the Scripture is another Scripture. So will you turn, please, to the book of Hebrews, chapter 9, where you will find mentioned this very passage of Scripture at which we have been looking in Exodus, chapter 24

Hebrews 9

11But Christ being come an high priest of good things to come, by a greater and more perfect tabernacle, not made with hands, that is to say, not of this building;
12Neither by the blood of goats and calves, but by his own blood he entered in once into the holy place, having obtained eternal redemption for us.
13For if the blood of bulls and of goats, and the ashes of an heifer sprinkling the unclean, sanctifieth to the purifying of the flesh:
14How much more shall the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit offered himself without spot to God, purge your conscience from dead works to serve the living God?
15And for this cause he is the mediator of the new testament, [covenant] that by means of death, for the redemption of the transgressions that were under the first testament, [covenant] they which are called might receive the promise of eternal inheritance.
16For where a [covenant] testament is, there must also of necessity be the death of the testator [the one who makes the covenant] .
17For where a testament [covenant] is of force after men are dead: otherwise it is of no strength at all while the testator [the one who makes it] liveth.
18Whereupon neither the first testament [covenant] was dedicated without blood.
19[Notice these verses, for they are a commentary on what we have been reading in Exodus 24:] For when Moses had spoken every precept to all the people according to the law, he took the blood of calves and of goats, with water, and scarlet wool, and hyssop, and sprinkled both the book, and all the people,
20Saying, This is the blood of the testament which God hath enjoined unto you.
21Moreover [later, on another occasion] he sprinkled with blood both the tabernacle, and all the vessels of the ministry.
22And almost all things [that means everything] are by the law purged with blood; and without shedding of blood is no remission.

An Eternal Principle

This is God's eternal principle. It was illustrated in the Old Testament by the shedding of the blood of animals. It was fulfilled when the Lord Jesus Christ died upon the Cross and shed His blood as a sacrifice for your sins and for mine.

Peace of God Provided By the Blood

I would like for you to go back to Exodus, chapter 24, and notice what is to me a beautiful illustration of the peace of God–a beautiful illustration of how fear can be dispelled, and peace can take hold of the human heart, when God's demands are met. The animals had been sacrificed, the blood had been sprinkled, and in verse 9 we read:

Exodus 24

9Then went up Moses, and Aaron, Nadab, and Abihu, and seventy of the elders of Israel:
10And they saw the God of Israel: and there was under his feet as it were a paved work of a sapphire stone, and as it were the body of heaven in his clearness.
11And upon the nobles of the children of Israel he laid not his hand: also [notice this now] they saw God, and did eat and drink.

That is a most amazing thing. In chapter 20 of the book of Exodus, before the blood was shed, before the demands of God were met, they were scared to death. They said, “Moses, don't let God talk to us any more. You talk to Him and then you talk to us.” They moved as far back from the mountain as they could get because they were so afraid. But after the blood was shed and God's demands were met, where do we find them? Right at the foot of the mountain in the presence of God, eating and drinking, indicating that they were perfectly at peace. You see, when God's demands in relation to sin are met, there is peace. That is the reason why the Spirit of God says, “Therefore being justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ” (Romans 5:1).

Access to the Throne of God

Will you notice the application of this truth which the Spirit of God makes in Hebrews, chapter 10, verse 11:

Hebrews 10

11And every priest standeth daily ministering and offering oftentimes the same sacrifices, which can never take away sins:
12But this man, [this man, Jesus] after he had offered one sacrifice for sins for ever, sat down on the right hand of God;
13From henceforth expecting till his enemies be made his footstool.
14For by one offering he hath perfected for ever them that are sanctified.
15Whereof the Holy Ghost also is a witness to us: for after that he had said before,
16This is the covenant that I will make with them after those days, saith the Lord, I will put my laws into their hearts, and in their minds will I write them;
17And their sins and iniquities will I remember no more.
18[Notice now] Now where remission of these is, there is no more offering for sin [that simply means that if your sins are remitted, you do not have to make another offering for them.]
19[Notice] Having therefore, brethren, boldness to enter into the holiest by the blood of Jesus,
20By a new and living way, which he hath consecrated for us, through the veil, that is to say, his flesh;
21And having an high priest over the house of God;
22[Notice] Let us draw near with a true heart in full assurance of faith, having our hearts sprinkled from an evil conscience, and our bodies washed with pure water.

Do you have the assurance that you can go directly into the presence of God on the basis of the goodness of Jesus Christ, and not be afraid as you go? Do you have the assurance that when you come to God in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ, He is going to receive you? If you do not have that assurance, you may have it, because the Lord Jesus Christ has shed His blood once and for all to pave the way directly to the Throne of God. Any person who recognizes that he is a sinner and that he cannot save himself, who places his faith and his trust in the Lord Jesus Christ for complete salvation, can have that peace that these Israelites had when they sat down at the foot of the mountain and ate and drank in the presence of God. I hope you have that peace now.

Shall we bow our heads together for prayer:

Father, we thank Thee for this time in the Word. We thank Thee for the clear picture presented in the Word of God that when man stands condemned before a Holy God there is a provision made. We thank Thee that as the Israelites felt the need of someone to stand between them and God, we have felt that need too. We thank Thee that one day we asked the Lord Jesus Christ to be our Mediator. We asked the Lord Jesus Christ to be our go-between. We thank Thee that we have the assurance that He accepted the task for us, and that today in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ, on the merit of His shed blood, we stand uncondemned. We thank Thee for that as we remember that there is therefore now no condemnation to them who are in Christ Jesus.


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