The Architect of the Tabernacle
Dr. Joe Temple

Introduction

Open your Bibles, please, to the book of Exodus, chapter 31:

Exodus 31

1And the LORD spake unto Moses, saying,
2See, I have called by name Bezaleel the son of Uri, the son of Hur, of the tribe of Judah:
3And I have filled him with the spirit of God, in wisdom, and in understanding, and in knowledge, and in all manner of workmanship,
4To devise cunning works, to work in gold, and in silver, and in brass,
5And in cutting of stones, to set them, and in carving of timber, to work in all manner of workmanship.
6And I, behold, I have given with him Aholiab, the son of Ahisamach, of the tribe of Dan: and in the hearts of all that are wise hearted I have put wisdom, that they may make all that I have commanded thee;
7The tabernacle of the congregation, and the ark of the testimony, and the mercy seat that is thereupon, and all the furniture of the tabernacle,
8And the table and his furniture, and the pure candlestick with all his furniture, and the altar of incense,
9And the altar of burnt offering with all his furniture, and the laver and his foot,
10And the cloths of service, and the holy garments for Aaron the priest, and the garments of his sons, to minister in the priest's office,
11And the anointing oil, and sweet incense for the holy place: according to all that I have commanded thee shall they do.

Turn, please, to chapter 35:

Exodus 35

30And Moses said unto the children of Israel, See, the LORD hath called by name Bezaleel the son of Uri, the son of Hur, of the tribe of Judah;
31And he hath filled him with the spirit of God, in wisdom, in understanding, and in knowledge, and in all manner of workmanship;
32And to devise curious works, to work in gold, and in silver, and in brass,
33And in the cutting of stones, to set them, and in carving of wood, to make any manner of cunning work.
34And he hath put in his heart that he may teach, both he, and Aholiab, the son of Ahisamach, of the tribe of Dan.
35Them hath he filled with wisdom of heart, to work all manner of work, of the engraver, and of the cunning workman, and of the embroiderer, in blue, and in purple, in scarlet, and in fine linen, and of the weaver, even of them that do any work, and of those that devise cunning work.

We continue with chapter 36, verse 1:

Exodus 36

1Then wrought Bezaleel and Aholiab, and every wise hearted man, in whom the LORD put wisdom and understanding to know how to work all manner of work for the service of the sanctuary, according to all that the LORD had commanded.
2And Moses called Bezaleel and Aholiab, and every wise hearted man, in whose heart the LORD had put wisdom, even every one whose heart stirred him up to come unto the work to do it:
3And they received of Moses all the offering, which the children of Israel had brought for the work of the service of the sanctuary, to make it withal. And they brought yet unto him free offerings every morning.
4And all the wise men, that wrought all the work of the sanctuary, came every man from his work which they made;
5And they spake unto Moses, saying, The people bring much more than enough for the service of the work, which the LORD commanded to make.
6And Moses gave commandment, and they caused it to be proclaimed throughout the camp, saying, Let neither man nor woman make any more work for the offering of the sanctuary. So the people were restrained from bringing.
7For the stuff they had was sufficient for all the work to make it, and too much.

Now turn, please, to chapter 25 of the book of Exodus:

Exodus 25

1And the LORD spake unto Moses, saying,
2Speak unto the children of Israel, that they bring me an offering: of every man that giveth it willingly with his heart ye shall take my offering.
3And this is the offering which ye shall take of them; gold, and silver, and brass,
4And blue, and purple, and scarlet, and fine linen, and goats' hair,
5And rams' skins dyed red, and badgers' skins, and shittim wood,
6Oil for the light, spices for anointing oil, and for sweet incense,
7Onyx stones, and stones to be set in the ephod, and in the breastplate.
8And let them make me a sanctuary; that I may dwell among them.
9According to all that I shew thee, after the pattern of the tabernacle, and the pattern of all the instruments thereof, even so shall ye make it.

Now turn, please, to chapter 38 of the book of Exodus:

Exodus 38

21This is the sum of the tabernacle, even of the tabernacle of testimony, as it was counted, according to the commandment of Moses, for the service of the Levites, by the hand of Ithamar, son to Aaron the priest.
22And Bezaleel the son Uri, the son of Hur, of the tribe of Judah, made all that the LORD commanded Moses.
23And with him was Aholiab, son of Ahisamach, of the tribe of Dan, an engraver, and a cunning workman, and an embroiderer in blue, and in purple, and in scarlet, and fine linen.
24All the gold that was occupied for the work in all the work of the holy place, even the gold of the offering, was twenty and nine talents, and seven hundred and thirty shekels, after the shekel of the sanctuary.
25And the silver of them that were numbered of the congregation was an hundred talents, and a thousand seven hundred and threescore and fifteen shekels, after the shekel of the sanctuary:
26A bekah for every man, that is, half a shekel, after the shekel of the sanctuary, for every one that went to be numbered, from twenty years old and upward, for six hundred thousand and three thousand and five hundred and fifty men.
27And of the hundred talents of silver were cast the sockets of the sanctuary, and the sockets of the vail; an hundred sockets of the hundred talents, a talent for a socket.
28And of the thousand seven hundred seventy and five shekels he made hooks for the pillars, and overlaid their chapiters, and filleted them.
29And the brass of the offering was seventy talents, and two thousand and four hundred shekels.
30And therewith he made the sockets to the door of the tabernacle of the congregation, and the brasen altar, and the brasen grate for it, and all the vessels of the altar,
31And the sockets of the court round about, and the sockets of the court gate, and all the pins of the tabernacle, and all the pins of the court round about.

You may think this is a long Scripture reading. We will be looking at every verse in these passages; we read them so that you may have fixed in your mind the basic things about which we wish to speak. We have discussed with you the Tabernacle from an introductory standpoint. You will remember that the Tabernacle was built according to the pattern that God gave Moses from Heaven and which Moses conveyed to the people. Before we look at the actual construction of the Tabernacle, we want to look at the architect.

Bezaleel Chosen By God

Moses was not the architect of the Tabernacle. Moses was simply the one to whom the pattern was given. The privilege of building the Tabernacle was reserved for another man, and it is about that man along with his co-helpers that we wish to speak. In the instructions which were given for the building of the Tabernacle by Bezaleel and his workers lie the basic instructions for all true Christian service.

You will remember that the Tabernacle was described for us in the Word of God not only from a historical standpoint, but from a spiritual and typical standpoint as well. We will miss the purpose of the great portion of the Word that is given to the Tabernacle if we do not endeavor to learn the lesson from it that we should.

Turn back to chapter 31 of the book of Exodus and notice what is said to us about God's choice for the architect of the Tabernacle. Bezaleel was God's choice to build the Tabernacle, and it is important for us to know this. Moses as the leader of the nation of Israel did not choose Bezaleel. There was not a committee of Levites who got together and chose Bezaleel. Bezaleel was God's choice, and it is very important for us to recognize that.

A Personal Call to Service

The importance of so recognizing it becomes evident if you will look at verse 2 of chapter 31 and notice that the very first word of the verse is “see.” In verse 6, you will notice that the third word is “behold.” These two words are always used in the Scripture to cause us to stop and consider what is being suggested. In verse 2, we read:

Exodus 31

2See, I have called by name Bezaleel the son of Uri, the son of Hur, of the tribe of Judah:

In verse 6 we read:

Exodus 31

6And I, behold, I have given with him Aholiab, the son of Ahisamach, of the tribe of Dan: and in the hearts of all that are wise hearted I have put wisdom, that they may make all that I have commanded thee;

These two verses suggest that any kind of Christian service finds its roots in a personal call from God. The prophet who takes it upon himself to run with a message, God dishonors. The prophet who decides that because someone else has chosen him he should go, God will not honor. God calls individuals personally for His service, in His sovereign right to do so.

That becomes evident if you will notice in verse 2 the words, “See, I have called by name.” That phrase is interesting. Not only does it suggest what I have pointed out, but also it suggests the importance that is attached to Old Testament characters. In our study of the Old Testament, we have found that individuals did not receive their names because they were the sons of so-and-so or because they were related to some individual or because some individual had marched across the stage of the world and was popular at that time. They did not receive names because of their euphony and melodious sound. They received names because of what God knew they would be. Old Testament patriarchs were prophets, and they gave to their children names of a prophetic character. They did not always understand how it could be, but they spoke by inspiration.

In the Shadow of God

Such is the case here, because this man Bezaleel and his ancestors represent some essential ingredients for Christians service. I believe that is why, in verse 2, we read:

Exodus 31

2See, I have called by name Bezaleel…

Let us look at the name “Bezaleel.” When translated, it means “in the shadow of God” or “under the protection of God.” Those descriptions, and the name can mean both, indicate two things that are necessary for a servant of the Lord who is to be more interested in doing God's work than in bowing the knee to the whims of man. Such an individual must dwell under the shadow of the Almighty. He must dwell in the secret places of the stairs (Song of Solomon 2:14). There must be that place of private conversation and fellowship with God.

Under God's Protection

The second meaning of the phrase is important also. If a man is going to do what God would have him do in the service to which he is called, he must be under the protection of God. Let me put that differently: He must realize that he is under the protection of God. The man who does not realize that he is under the protection of God when he is engaged in the service of God is so concerned with things that he has not time to do the work of God. The individual servant of the Lord must do what God has called him to do and leave the protection to God.

You will remember from the book of Nehemiah that after the children of Israel returned from their Babylonian captivity to the land, they set out to build the city and to rebuild the walls of the temple. But they were doing it not at the direction of the Spirit, as was Bezaleel, but out of their own interest and by their own calling. You will remember that they held a spear in one hand and a trowel in the other, and as they laid the stones of the temple they kept the spear ready to protect themselves from the enemy that might attack.

That is always true when you are doing things on your own; but if you are doing what you are doing at the command of God, you can leave the protection of God; you can do the work that God has called you to do. We must not pass up the name “Bezaleel” without emphasizing these things.

Significance of Names

Glance at verse 2 and notice that Bezaleel was the son of Uri. “Uri” means “light,” and there we have another requirement of Christian service. If the individual is leading, as Bezaleel was, he can lead no further than he has gone himself. He cannot lead out of darkness into light unless he is in the light himself.

Bezaleel was the grandson of Hur. “Hur” means “free” or “liberty,” and I cannot but be impressed with the fact that though these things which we have mentioned are true in relation to Christian service, service for God is not slavery. Service for God is a bondage of love. Service for God is the kind of service that is best illustrated by the bondslave whom we have noticed earlier in the book of Exodus who is willing to stay in slavery, though he could have his freedom, because love had become his master.

Bezaleel was of the tribe of Judah. There were twelve tribes, and Bezaleel was of the tribe of Judah. The word “Judah” means “praise.” Here again I think there is real significance. The purpose of all our service should be the praise and glory of God. When we finish with the Tabernacle, we will see that the purpose of the Tabernacle was not only to serve as a dwelling place for God, but it was to show forth the praise and the glory of God. The names, then, of Bezaleel, his father, his grandfather, and the tribe from which he came are significant as to the requirements of Christian service.

Importance of Fellowship

We pointed out as we read these various passages that Bezaleel was not alone in this service. He had someone to help him. He had someone to support him. God said:

Exodus 31

6And I, behold, I have given with him Aholiab, the son of Ahisamach, of the tribe of Dan…

Yes, Aholiab was called of God to support Bezaleel. What do you suppose the name “Aholiab” means? It means “the tent of the father,” “the dwelling place of the father.” Here again we have reference to the importance of fellowship. There can be no real service without fellowship. The reason a great many people are living barren lives today, whether they realize it or not, is that they are out of fellowship with God. The moment you are out of fellowship with God, the wheels stop turning and you mark time and accomplish nothing. That is why it is so serious to be out of fellowship with the Lord Jesus Christ.

I don't know how many times I have entered into conversation with people about the spiritual condition of a loved one. They say, “He is born again; there is no question about that. Of course, he is out of fellowship”–as though that was not too important. It is tremendously important. It is serious from a twofold standpoint. First, the individual who is out of fellowship is putting himself in line for the chastening of God. And second, the individual who is out of fellowship will have wasted time written on his record–wasted hours, wasted days, wasted weeks, wasted months, wasted years perhaps. It is important to be in fellowship.

Did you notice who Aholiab's father was? According to verse 6, his father was Ahisamach. Do you know what “Ahisamach” means? This is very interesting in view of the calling of Aholiab. “Ahisamach” means “brother of support,” or “a brother who supports.” That was the job that Aholiab had to do. He was the individual who was called for no other reason than to support Bezaleel in the work that he had to do.

Christian Service to Be Judged

Aholiab was from the tribe of Dan. The word “Dan” means “judge.” I think we have another element of Christian service brought to our attention. Just as certainly as the goal of all Christian service ought to be the praise and the glory of God, as was the building of the Tabernacle, every one who is engaged in Christian service should keep in mind that the work he is doing will someday be judged.

Notice what I am saying: The work that the Christian servant is doing will someday be judged. No, I am not talking about judging for sin. I am not talking about judgment in regard to salvation. Judgment for sin was settled on the Cross. If you are a born-again believer, as the Word of God says, “There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus” (Romans 8:1). Everything we do in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ will have to stand the scrutinizing gaze of a holy God. If we could only realize that–I mean really realize that–I wonder whether our service might be different.

I say to you that I will have to see this study stand the scrutinizing gaze of a holy God at the Judgment Seat of Christ. That is a solemn thought to me. I heard an old preacher say one time to a young preacher, “If you can do anything but preach, for God's sake, don't preach!” He did not mean if the individual was capable of doing anything. He simply meant that if he could be happy, if he could be satisfied, if he could be content, doing anything but preaching, don't preach. The reason that old gentleman said that was that he realized the tremendous responsibility that goes with teaching God's Word.

James recognized this responsibility. That was why in his epistle he discouraged people who seek to be teachers. He said that there are many ways to cause people to stumble. One of the ways in which we can cause people to stumble is through the things we preach and teach. It is a tremendous responsibility. Yes, someday I will have to stand and see this message tested by the light of God.

May I remind you in all love and understanding that you will have to give an account for this opportunity you have had to sit under the sound of the Word of God. The individual who hears the Word has a greater responsibility than the one who does not, and judgment is in order.

God Gives the Increase

Turn, please, to a familiar passage of Scripture, I Corinthians, chapter 3, which deals with the very subject about which we are talking–the matter of building. There were divisions in the Corinthian church because there was jealousy in the church in regard to preachers. How that must grieve the heart of God, and how ashamed many preachers ought to be for fostering such a spirit. Some of the individuals, if you will glance at verse 4, said, “I am of Paul.” Another said, “I am of Apollos.” “I'm glad that I was saved when Paul preached,” was what some of them were saying. Others were saying, “Well, I'm not. I'm glad I was saved when Apollos preached”–as though it made a difference.

Look at I Corinthians, chapter 3, verse 5:

I Corinthians 3

5Who then is Paul, and who is Apollos, but ministers by whom ye believed, even as the Lord gave to every man?

That is why it distresses me to hear a preacher talk about how many converts they had in a service or how many converts they had in a meeting.

I Corinthians 3

6I have planted, Apollos watered; but God gave the increase.

Sometimes when I am preaching, at the close of the message, because I feel led of the Lord, I give an invitation for people to acknowledge Jesus Christ as Savior. Sometimes, by the same principle, I don't give an invitation. I think it is foolhardy to sing a song just for the sake of singing it, hoping that someone will come to the front because people are used to doing that sort of thing. When the Lord is pleased to lead someone to a public acknowledgment of the Lord Jesus Christ, do I have any right to say so-and-so was saved in my service? I do not have. Maybe I did have the privilege of watering it. It is God who gives the increase. How do I have any right to say anything about it?

Look at verse 7:

I Corinthians 3

7So then neither is he that planteth any thing, neither he that watereth…

That lets the wind out of our sails; it deflates preachers in an amazing fashion. You see what God says about us? We are nothing. He says it not only once; He keeps on saying it. Without being facetious or sacrilegious, I would like to say that God rubs it in. Notice how many times He waters down the servants of the Lord: “Who then is Paul, and who is Apollos…well, who does he think he is?” That is the spirit of the verse. All in the world they were, were ministers who happened to be there when the individual placed his faith in Christ.

I Corinthians 3

7So then neither is he that planteth any thing, neither he that watereth; but God that giveth the increase.
8Now he that planteth and he that watereth are one: and every man shall receive his own reward according to his own labour.
9For we are labourers together with God: ye are God's husbandry, ye are God's building.
10According to the grace of God which is given unto me, as a wise masterbuilder, I have laid the foundation, and another buildeth thereon. [ This is what I want you to get ] But let every man take heed how he buildeth thereupon.

That is the responsibility. Take heed how you build. Why? Look at verse 12:

I Corinthians 3

12Now if any man build upon this foundation [ the foundation mentioned in verse 11 is Jesus Christ ] gold, silver, precious stones, wood, hay, stubble;
13Every man's work shall be made manifest: for the day shall declare it, because it shall be revealed by fire; and the fire [ notice ] shall try every man's work of what sort it is.

If these message proves to be nothing more than wood and hay and stubble, it will not stand the test of fire at the Judgment Seat of Christ. If it proves to be gold and silver and precious stones, it will, for we read in verse 14:

I Corinthians 3

14If any man's work abide which he hath built thereupon, he shall receive a reward.
15If any man's work shall be burned, he shall suffer loss [ he will suffer the loss of the reward ]: but he himself shall be saved; yet so as by fire.

The reason we turned to that passage was that “Dan,” which was Aholiab's tribe, means “to judge.” I think it is interesting and no mistake at all when the procession of workers went out to work on the Tabernacle, Bezaleel, of the tribe of Judah, which means “praise,” led the procession. Aholiab, of the tribe of “Dan,” which means “judge,” brought up the rear of the procession. In between were all the work and all the workers related to the Tabernacle. Again we are reminded that the purpose of all ministry is for the praise of the Lord, and all ministry must be done with the realization that it will be examined at the Judgment Seat of Christ.

Spirit-filled Workmen

If you will turn back to chapter 31, you will find a second thing about the architect of the Tabernacle. Not only was he called by name, but you will notice in verse 3 that God said, “I have filled him with the Spirit of God.” If you capitalize the word “Spirit” in that verse, you will be doing no violence to the Scripture because it is a reference to the Holy Spirit. Old Testament characters were filled with the Holy Spirit as New Testament characters were. The only difference is that Old Testament characters were not permanently filled, and people who have lived since the Cross, if they have accepted Jesus Christ as Savior, are permanently filled; the Holy Spirit has come to abide. On the promise of the Savior in John, chapters 14, 15, and 16, the Holy Spirit will not leave.

Did you notice why Bezaleel and Aholiab were filled with the Holy Spirit? They were filled with the Holy Spirit that they might “have wisdom and understanding and knowledge in all manner of workmanship, to devise cunning works, to work in gold, and in silver, and in brass.” According to Exodus, chapter 31, the reason Bezaleel and Aholiab were filled with the Holy Spirit was that they might do ordinary physical, secular work, even though the work upon the Tabernacle was work upon a building dedicated to God. It was mundane work such as putting boards and pouring silver and carving gold and silver and precious stones.

The emphasis I want to place is on the fact that this was not a spiritual work. You see, we depend upon the Holy Spirit when we are going to do something of a spiritual nature. But how many of us depend upon the direction of the Holy Spirit for ordinary, everyday things in life? Bezaleel did. We should, too. There is no reason in the world why, if you are God's child, you cannot ask the Holy Spirit to direct your drawing of a certain plan if you are an architect. He can give to your fingers just as much cunning as He did to the fingers of Bezaleel.

There is no reason why, if you are in business and are facing a difficult decision and do not know what to do, you cannot ask for the direction of the Holy Spirit Who is within you. You will discover that the Holy Spirit will so guide your mind that the decision will be a clear decision. I wish I could leave you with a real emphasis on the practicality of depending on the Holy Spirit for leadership in everyday, ordinary things.

Enabled to Teach

Turn, please, to chapter 35 for another reason why Bezaleel was filled with the Holy Spirit, another task that he had to do:

Exodus 35

34And he [ God ] hath put in his heart that he may teach, both he, and Aholiab, the son of Ahisamach, of the tribe of Dan.
35Them hath he filled with wisdom of heart, to work all manner of work, of the engraver, and of the cunning workman, and of the embroiderer, in blue, and in purple, in scarlet, and in fine linen, and of the weaver, even of them that do any work, and of those that devise cunning work.

They were filled with the Holy Spirit that they might be able to teach those who worked with them the things that needed to be done in the construction of the Tabernacle. And they were filled with the Holy Spirit that they might do the work themselves. The Holy Spirit in His teaching ministry will do a great work if you will let Him. The teaching in this chapter is not related to the teaching of the Word as we think of it. It was related to the teaching of skill. A teacher in a secular school system who knows the Lord as well as her subject, and who is indwelt by the Holy Spirit, can do a much better job of teaching than the individual who knows her subject, but does not know the Lord. The Holy Spirit can enable such an individual to teach better, as we have been suggesting.

Called to a Specific Work

God not only calls to service, and He not only fills with the Holy Spirit, which is an inducement, but He also specifies the work that the individual must do. God's chosen worker was not left to himself to decide what to do, when to do it, and how to do it.

Notice in the last part of verse 6 of chapter 31 that God said, “…that they may make all that I have commanded thee.” And in the last part of verse 11, “all that I have commanded thee shall they do.” God had a blueprint. Bezaleel, though he was not commissioned by Moses, but was called solely by God, could not say, “Well, God gave me this job, and I can do it the way I want to do it.” He could say, “God called me, and I must do the work according to God's plan.” All too many people today are of the opinion that the end justifies the means in God's work; that is not true. God will not honor work that is not done in His way, according to His plan, no matter how much good seems to come from it. He emphasized here that Bezaleel and Aholiab must do the work according to plan.

Helpers Raised Up By God

Bezaleel and Aholiab were not left to do this work themselves. Not only were they not left to do the work themselves, but they were unable to do it alone. God raised up a band of people to help them. Bezaleel and Aholilab did not go out and get the recruits. God raised them up. There is a big difference. There are a lot of men today engaged in the service of the Lord who are busy getting recruits. That is about all they get. But if they wait on the Lord and let the Lord raise up those who are to stand with them, then they have a group of people who can do the work. In chapter 36, will you notice verse 2:

Exodus 36

2And Moses called Bezaleel and Aholiab, and every wise hearted man, in whose heart the LORD had put wisdom, even every one whose heart stirred him up to come unto the work to do it:

These people did not do what they did because they were harassed into doing it. They did what they did because their hearts stirred them to do it. They did not do what they did on the threat of excommunication. They did what they did because their hearts stirred them to do it. Notice verse 3:

Exodus 36

3And they received of Moses all the offering, which the children of Israel had brought for the work of the service of the sanctuary, to make it withal. [ notice ] And they brought yet unto him free offerings every morning.

The meaning of the word “free” is “freewill” offerings. They brought the offerings because their hearts were stirred up. They were not forced to pledge. It was not wrung out of them. They did it all of their own free will. As evidence of that, in the next few verses, they brought so much that they had to be restrained from bringing:

Exodus 36

7For the stuff they had was sufficient for all the work to make it, and too much.

From the month of October through the month of January, depending upon the location and the group, you hear a lot of talk of church budgets that are half subscribed or nearly subscribed, and sometimes you hear of a budget that is over subscribed. But there is a vast difference between over subscription and the giving of an offering as it is suggested here. Why is it that the raising of money for the Lord's work seems to be such a tremendous ordeal? I think the answer is found right here. We do not wait for the hearts of individuals to be stirred. We try to stir them. I say this reverently, but I say it advisedly: Our stick is not long enough to stir hearts to give in such a way that they have to be restrained in their giving. We must learn that giving must be from a willing heart.

Giving From Willing Hearts

Turn back to chapter 35 and see that that is exactly what happened in this instance:

Exodus 35

5Take ye from among you an offering unto the LORD: whosoever is of a willing heart, let him bring it, an offering of the LORD; gold, and silver, and brass,

Notice verse 21:

Exodus 35

21And they came, every one whose heart stirred him up, and every one whom his spirit made willing, and they brought the LORD's offering to the work of the tabernacle of the congregation, and for all his service, and for the holy garments.
22And they came, both men and women, as many as were willing hearted, and brought bracelets, and earrings, and rings, and tablets, all jewels of gold: and every man that offered offered an offering of gold unto the LORD.

Notice in verse 29 the emphasis on this same thought:

Exodus 35

29The children of Israel brought a willing offering unto the LORD, every man and woman, whose heart made them willing to bring for all manner of work, which the LORD had commanded to be made by the hand of Moses.

Though Aholiab and Bezaleel were the chosen leaders for the work of the building of the Tabernacle, they would have been helpless without these individuals whose hearts stirred them to give willingly of the materials wherewith the Tabernacle was built. Read again the chapters in which were listed the various kinds of offerings which were brought. You will notice several things. The rich gave of their wealth; the individuals who did not have gold and silver and brass and precious stones paid of the material that they did have–goat's hair and ram's hair dyed red and badger's skin, etc.; those who had nothing gave of their works, their crafts, and their skills. The principle of willing-hearted giving is not legislated tithing. The principle of willing-heart giving is “as a man purposeth in his heart, so let him give” (II Corinthians 9:7). All of them out of willing hearts had a part.

Someone, speaking in the twentieth century says, “Well, now, that sort of thing is all right, but you don't get very much done that way. You can't build a very nice building if you leave it up to willing hearts. There has got to be a bond drive and there has got to be a money-raising campaign. You can't just leave it up to willing hearts.” You will remember what we read from chapter 38 of the book of Exodus; read it again when you have time. With pencil and paper and a Bible dictionary, sit down and figure out the value of this building. In present day values, you would find that this building cost five million dollars. There was not a bond sold or a money raising instituted. There was simply an opportunity for willing hearts to give. That is what the Spirit of God means in the New Testament when He says that God loveth a cheerful giver (II Corinthians 9:7). That does not mean that God loves an individual who has a crocodile smile on his face while he drops something into the collection plate. It means that God loves a giver who gives freely, without restraint, because his heart stirs him to give. He has joy in such giving.

The Rest of Faith

Did you notice that in each of the chapters where work related to the Tabernacle and workers are described, the Holy Spirit brings once again to our attention the Sabbath day? We are well aware that the Jewish Sabbath is not the Christian Lord's day, and great distress of mind has resulted from people's trying to make it so. But I do believe that the reason the Spirit of God has brought these truths into conjunction, one with the other, is to remind us that in all our hurry and bustle and activity, we must not forget to rest. I am not talking about physical rest. I could not say much about that that you would believe. I am talking about a rest of faith. I believe that no work that we are called upon to do will be effective unless we have time for this period of rest in the Lord, a rest of faith that will enable us to depend completely and fully upon Him for the strength that we need for the work that must be done. I would leave you with a promise that has meant much to my own heart during these days. “They that wait upon the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run, and not be weary; and they shall walk, and not faint” (Isaiah 40:31). I believe that.


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