Jehovah-InKaddesh - The Lord Which Sanctifies
Dr. Joe Temple

Introduction

You will remember that we have been thinking together about what we refer to as the Compound Names of God , or the Compound Names of Jehovah . If you are not familiar with that statement, it may sound a bit confusing to you, so we will remind you that in the Bible there are three names for God. One of them, of course, you recognize as God, but the Hebrew word is Elohim ; and then there are two other names that are translated in our English translation by the word Lord . If you are an observant reader of the Scripture, you know that the word Lord is spelled differently in each instance. Sometimes, it's spelled with every letter capitalized. Sometimes it is spelled with just the first letter capitalized. That is the translators' way of indicating to us that the word Lord spelled differently comes from two different Hebrew words. Thus we have our three Hebrew words: Elohim , translated “God;” Adonai is translated by the word Lord , with the first letter capitalized, and Jehovah is translated by the word LORD , with every letter capitalized. So we have the three basic names of our Creator; Elohim , Adonai , and Jehovah .

The word Jehovah is coupled with a number of other words in the Bible, representing the compound names of God, and we have been looking at them. For example there is the name Jehovah-Nissi , which means, “the LORD Our Banner.” There is the name Jehovah-Raah , which means “the LORD Our Shepherd,” and the name Jehovah-Shalom , “the LORD Our Peace.”

The Meaning of Sanctification

Today we come to the compound name of God which is not always listed with these others. For example, the Scofield Bible gives you the list of these compound names, but this name that we are going to talk about today is not listed in that group. There are books written on the compound names of God. This name is not usually listed in those books. I think perhaps the reason it is not listed is that the Hebrew word is not given in relation to this name as it is in most instances with the other, and yet it is a very important name of God, as far as our spiritual experiences are concerned, that we ought not to pass over. For that reason we look at it today.

Notice Leviticus, chapter 20, verses 7-8:

Leviticus 20

7Sanctify yourselves therefore, and be ye holy: for I am the LORD your God.
8And ye shall keep my statutes, and do them: I am the LORD which sanctify you.

If you look at these two verses of Scripture, you will notice in verse 7 two of the names of God. The word LORD there has every letter capitalized. That's Jehovah , and the word God is the word Elohim . Then in verse 8, we find another compound name of God:

Leviticus 20

8And ye shall keep my statutes, and do them: I am the LORD which sanctify you.

We have looked at these other compound names: the LORD who heals , the LORD who gives peace , and the LORD who is our banner . We find this another compound name, the LORD who sanctifies . Of course, you will want the Hebrew name along with these others. It is Jehovah-Mkaddesh, which presents to us that characteristic of God which is related to His sanctifying power.

The Separating Power of God

We're going to look at some things in the Word related to His sanctifying power, but I would like to call to your attention that in this chapter and the two succeeding chapters this name is presented six more times. I would like to point out some verses of Scripture to you in which the name is found. Notice, please, verse 24 of chapter 20.

Leviticus 20

24But I have said unto you, Ye shall inherit their land, and I will give it unto you to possess it, a land that floweth with milk and honey: I am the LORD your God, which have separated you from other people.

“I am the LORD which separates.” The word separates is the same as the word sanctify because that is the meaning of the word sanctify . Basically, the word sanctify means “to set apart,” “to separate.” God separates places, we shall see as we look at the Word. He separates things; He separates days, and He separates people. When we think of Jehovah-Mkaddesh , we think about the separating power of God.

If you will look down at verse 26:

Leviticus 20

26And ye shall be holy unto me: for I the LORD am holy, and have severed you from other people, that ye should be mine.

You'll notice in verse 26. “Ye shall be holy unto me: for I the LORD am holy. I am the LORD; I am Jehovah-Mkaddesh. ” The word holy is the same word as the word sanctify , as the word separate : Jehovah-Mkaddesh .

And then if you will look farther down in the next chapter, you will notice in verse 15:

Leviticus 21

15Neither shall he profane his seed among his people: for I the LORD do sanctify him.

“I the LORD do sanctify him.” Jehovah-Mkaddesh . If you were to read the passage of Scripture, you would realize that he is talking about responsibilities that were related to the Aaronic priesthood. One of the responsibilities was related to marriage. The individual concerned had to be careful about that relationship, because the seed that was born in the line of the priesthood must be set apart and not be tainted or profaned in any way.

Then if you will look down at verse 23, you will notice:

Leviticus 21

23Only he shall not go in unto the vail, nor come nigh unto the altar, because he hath a blemish; that he profane not my sanctuaries: for I the LORD do sanctify them.

Jehovah-Mkaddesh . “I the LORD do sanctify…”

Thus far in these verses at which we have glanced, we have noticed that the Lord sanctifies service, that the Lord sanctifies people. Here He sanctifies things, because He is talking about the sanctuaries into which a priest who had been defiled could not go, because God demands perfection in relation to his worship.

If you will look down at chapter 22, verse 9:

Leviticus 22

9They shall therefore keep mine ordinance, lest they bear sin for it, and die therefore, if they profane it: I the LORD do sanctify them.

There is our name again—Jehovah-Mkaddesh . Here He is speaking about the priesthood and worship in relation to the things of God.

Notice in verses 14-16:

Leviticus 22

14And if a man eat of the holy thing unwittingly, then he shall put the fifth part thereof unto it, and shall give it unto the priest with the holy thing.
15And they shall not profane the holy things of the children of Israel, which they offer unto the LORD;
16Or suffer them to bear the iniquity of trespass, when they eat their holy things: for I the LORD do sanctify them.

Jehovah-Mkaddesh . Here He is talking about sanctifying the food that was related to the offering in the temple.

The Challenge for Our Sanctification

Today we are not primarily interested with this Old Testament sacrifice, because it would be a study beyond the immediate scope of this lesson. I wanted you to see that this is the name of God. Then I want you to see that it is related to us who live in this particular dispensation. Before we leave chapter 20 of the book of Leviticus, however, I would like for you to notice verse 7:

Leviticus 20

7Sanctify yourselves therefore, and be ye holy: for I am the LORD your God.
8And ye shall keep my statutes, and do them: I am the LORD which sanctify you.

Notice in verse 7, the challenge:

Leviticus 20

7Sanctify yourselves therefore, and be ye holy:

Then in verse 8:

Leviticus 20

8And ye shall keep my statutes, and do them: I am the LORD which sanctify you.

The challenge for our sanctification (notice this because it's tremendously important) is based upon something that God has already done. And so it is in the Scripture; the challenge is always based upon a finished work. The challenge for the state of our living is always based upon our standing before the Lord.

Sanctification, God's Finished Work

That makes Christianity in its approach different to any other religion. I use that term very sparingly, because I don't like to use the word religion in relation to Christianity. But for purposes of illustration, that's the difference between religion and Christianity or any other religion. Every other religion puts the whole responsibility upon man. Christianity puts it upon God, and then gives the challenge to man. God holds the standard way up here and says, “Now it is all yours. All you have to do is claim it.” Ordinarily God might say, if He were operating on the human level, to individual humans, “Sanctify yourself, and then I'll see about accepting you. You sanctify yourself, and I'll see about blessings. You sanctify yourself, and if you do a good enough job, I'll approve it.” But not so in Christianity. He says, “I have already sanctified you. You sanctify yourself on the basis of the fact that I have done the work.”

Let's turn, for purpose of illustration, to the New Testament, to Paul's letter to the Philippians to see a concrete illustration of what I am talking about, that the challenge for sanctification is based upon the fact that God has already sanctified us. Philippians, chapter 2, verses 12 and 13:

Philippians 2

12Wherefore, my beloved, as ye have always obeyed, not as in my presence only, but now much more in my absence, work out your own salvation with fear and trembling.
13For it is God which worketh in you both to will and to do of his good pleasure.

Let's stop our reading right there for a moment, and let those words sink in. Notice what he is saying:

Philippians 2

12Wherefore, my beloved, as ye have always obeyed, not as in my presence only, but now much more in my absence, work out your own salvation with fear and trembling.

If we stop right there, that would be the most discouraging verse you could run across in the Word of God. To tell a poor human being who is prone to sin—more prone to sin than he is to righteousness—to work out his own salvation would be something discouraging indeed. Indeed, we would want to print the words with fear and trembling in heavy type, because we certainly would be working it out with fear and trembling, no certainty at all concerning our salvation, no knowledge at all that we were approved of God, no knowledge at all that what we were doing would ever work out to success. Work out your own salvation with fear and trembling. The feeling we would have would be that certainly we might fail; and if we failed after a lifetime of strenuous work, then we would go to a sinner's grave and a sinner's hell. Is there anything more discouraging than that? Is anything more distressing than that? And yet, there are multitudes of people who have no more hope than that because they don't ever realize the truth of the next verse. Notice what it says:

Philippians 2

12Wherefore, my beloved, as ye have always obeyed, not as in my presence only, but now much more in my absence, work out your own salvation with fear and trembling.
13For it is God which worketh in you both to will and to do of his good pleasure.

What did we read there in Leviticus, chapter 20? “Sanctify yourselves, for I am the LORD- Mkaddesh . I am Jehovah-Mkaddesh ; I sanctify you.” Here He is saying, “Work out your own salvation, for I am working in you.” And all in the world that will necessitate is our getting on the right wave length with God. He is working in us. As He works in us, we work out, we manifest, what He has worked in.

Our Responsibility In Sanctification

I might digress long enough, if it is a digression, to suggest to you that it is utterly impossible to work out what God has not worked in. That is the sad state of many, many people today. Our churches are filled with people who are trying to work out what God has never worked in. They fail miserably in the process, and in their failure they are discouraged to the point of giving up and saying, “There is nothing to it at all.” This is just another way of saying that you must be born again, for if God hasn't done the work first, it is an utter impossibility for you or me to it. “Sanctify yourselves, for I the LORD have sanctified you.”

Turn with me, please, to the second epistle of Peter, and notice the first chapter, as this thought is further amplified, so that we can see that we are merely taking advantage of what God has already done. II Peter, chapter 1, verse 2-3:

II Peter 1

2Grace and peace be multiplied unto you through the knowledge of God, and of Jesus our Lord,
3According as his divine power hath given unto us all things that pertain unto life and godliness, through the knowledge of him that hath called us to glory and virtue:

Notice in this second verse:

II Peter 1

3According as his divine power hath given unto us all things that pertain unto life and godliness…

They are ours! He has already finished the work. He has already completed the job. Look down at verse 10:

II Peter 1

10Wherefore the rather, brethren, give diligence to make your calling and election sure: for if ye do these things, ye shall never fall:
11For so an entrance shall be ministered unto you abundantly into the everlasting kingdom of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ.

If we were to pick up our Bibles, as some people do, and let our finger fall on a verse and consider that verse in the light of it's context, you would find verse 10 to be very discouraging. It would make your relationship to the Lord a task instead of a privilege. It would make it a burden instead of a joy.

II Peter 1

10Wherefore the rather, brethren, give diligence to make your calling and election sure…

You would spend the entire day saying, “I hope I'm saved today. I'll try a little harder. Maybe by night, I'll feel more safe than I do this morning.” You would make an effort to make your calling and election sure.

Someone might come to you and ask you about your relationship to Christ. If you had done particularly well that day, you would say, “Yes, I believe I'm saved.” But if you hadn't done particularly well that day you would say, “Well, I just don't know if I'm saved or not.” And hanging over your head all the time is the fear that you might fall and before you could quit falling, you might fall right into Hell, and there would be no joy and no peace.

Making Salvation Evident

If you keep in mind that verse 10 should be read always with verse 3, you would realize that you're not making your salvation sure, as far as security is concerned; but you're making your salvation evident. You would be doing exactly what we suggested when we started out on this journey through the Word. You would be sanctifying yourself because God had already sanctified you. You would be, in this passage of Scripture, making your calling and election evident because of the fact that you had been called. If you really want to make your calling and election evident and make the process of verses 5-8 a part of your experience, you will find that a number of things happen to you.

In verse 9, if you follow the procedure that is suggested in the foregoing verses, you're not going to be blind to spiritual things. The verse presents it from the negative standpoint. We're presenting it from the positive. You are not going to be blind to spiritual things. What does that mean? It means that you will be walking in all the light that you have, and as you walk in all the light you have, God gives you more light.

There are people today who say, “Oh, I wish I knew about the Word of God. I wish I knew more of the Word. Why doesn't God reveal these things to me?” God doesn't reveal them because you are not walking in the light you have. If you walk in the light that you have, your spiritual vision is sharpened and you are able to grasp the truth. If these things are true in your life, you will also see that you will have the vision of faith. This passage of Scripture says you won't be able to see afar off if these things are not true. All you can see is the immediate. How many Christians there are today that can't see the forest for the trees! All they see is what is right in front of them; that's all. They have no ability to see afar off. They have no ability to see beyond the circumstances. Once you have grown in grace, as is really the meaning of these terms, you have the ability to see afar off—way down the line—and you can see as God can see.

Assurance of Salvation

In the latter part of verse 9, if these things are true, you will have the absolute assurance of your salvation. The way that it is presented in this verse of Scripture is that if these things are not true, you will even forget that you've been saved. A person will walk up to you perhaps, if you are not walking in the light that you have, if you're not adding faith to virtue and to virtue knowledge, etc., and say,“Are you a Christian?” Apt as not you will say, “I don't guess I am; I don't know. No, I'm not,” all because you haven't grown in grace, because you haven't followed the challenge of Jehovah-Mkaddesh, “I the LORD do sanctify you.”

Look at verse 11, where he changes from the negative to the positive:

II Peter 1

11For so an entrance shall be ministered unto you abundantly into the everlasting kingdom of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ.

There are two ways that you can enter Heaven. I don't mean that there are two ways to get there. There is one way, and He is it. But there are two ways, two manners, in which you can enter Heaven. You can have an abundant entrance into Heaven, or you can get there and hardly anybody will know you're there. You can have such an entrance into Heaven that when you get there, there will be so many folk down at the wharf to meet the ship of Zion that all of Heaven will say, “What's going on down there?” They'll say, “Well, don't you know, So-and-So has arrived,” or you can get there where you will just get in and you will be about the only one that knows it. That is the real meaning in this abundant entrance. It means a great crowd of people will greet you when you get there.

How can you have an abundant entrance? Well, if we had time to compare several Scriptures with this verse of Scripture, we would find that the manner in which we have an abundant entrance into Heaven is related to the manner of our witnessing, the people to whom we witness, those who are brought to a saving knowledge of Jesus Christ through our witness in the Word of God. Those folk are there to meet us and greet us and grant to us an abundant entrance.

We could go on, but I think we have given you enough passages of Scripture that you can see that you are being set apart for God on the basis of His having already set you apart. It is your responsibility and mine to live up to the full, complete end of our privileges, and most of us are not doing that. Most of us are living far beneath what God intended we should.

God's Expectation and Our Response

One last passage of Scripture. Turn, please, in your Bibles to I Thessalonians, chapter 4, verses 1-7:

I Thessalonians 4

1Furthermore then we beseech you, brethren, and exhort you by the Lord Jesus, that as ye have received of us how ye ought to walk and to please God, so ye would abound more and more.
2For ye know what commandments we gave you by the Lord Jesus.
3For this is the will of God, even your sanctification, that ye should abstain from fornication:
4That every one of you should know how to possess his vessel in sanctification and honour;
5Not in the lust of concupiscence, even as the Gentiles which know not God:
6That no man go beyond and defraud his brother in any matter: because that the Lord is the avenger of all such, as we also have forewarned you and testified.
7For God hath not called us unto uncleanness, but unto holiness.

We will stop reading there. You recognize without my commenting, I'm sure, that this passage is dealing with sanctification in relationship to cleanliness—spiritual cleanliness, sanctification in relation to holiness. This is the thought that I want to leave with you, however, in closing, the thought that is bound up in one phrase, which would have been sufficient for our purposes today. Verse 3:

I Thessalonians 4

3For this is the will of God, even your sanctification…

It's amazing how we drift into the habit of using language that is not scriptural, and I dare say we are all guilty of it. How many times have we spoken of spiritual Christians? How many times have we spoken of worldly Christians? How many times have we said, concerning an individual, “He's such a good Christian.”? In the sight of God, there is not a special group of people up here who are living above the average and so are spiritual and a special group of people down here who are living below the average and so are worldly. Remember what I said: In God's sight that may be true as far as practical experience is concerned, and that's the reason we drift into the habit of using this conversation that isn't scriptural, but this passage of Scripture says, “It is the will of God, even your sanctification.” It's not a matter of your being sanctified if you want to pay the price. It's not a matter of your being sanctified if you want to go a little bit deeper than anybody else. It's what God expects of you. God is not pleased with anything less than the best.


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