Micah's Apostasy
Dr. Joe Temple

Introduction

Open your Bibles, please, to book of Judges, chapter 17. We're going to begin the study of a new section of the book of Judges; and that being true, I think it is helpful for us to remember the analysis of the book so we will know exactly where we are. You recall that we told you the first section of the book we had the approach to the book of Judges, the background of the book, why the book of Judges was written, why the conditions existed which existed in the book of Judges.

Keeping a marker in Judges, chapter 17, it would be helpful to us if you turn back to chapter 1 of the book of Judges and notice verse 1:

Judges 1

1Now after the death of Joshua it came to pass, that the children of Israel asked the LORD, saying, Who shall go up for us against the Canaanites first, to fight against them?

That indicates that Joshua had died and a new period of time had begun. Look at verse 28 of chapter 1:

Judges 1

28And it came to pass, when Israel was strong, that they put the Canaanites to tribute, and did not utterly drive them out.

The period of Judges was spent in a time of testing because they did not completely obey the Lord. Look at the chapter 2, verse 3, where you will read:

Judges 2

3Wherefore [this is God speaking] I also said, I will not drive them [these nations] out from before you; but they shall be as thorns in your sides, and their gods shall be a snare unto you.

And in verse 7:

Judges 2

7And the people served the LORD all the days of Joshua, and all the days of the elders that outlived Joshua, who had seen all the great works of the LORD, that he did for Israel.

Then verse 10:

Judges 2

10And also all that generation were gathered unto their fathers: and there arose another generation after them, which knew not the LORD, nor yet the works which he had done for Israel.

These verses all describe for us what we term the approach or background to the book of Judges. A generation that knew not the Lord will be the subject of our discussion. The second portion of the book, the apostasies, are described in chapters 3-16.

The Appendix

The third section of the book, the appendix, we are going to begin to study together in this lesson. It includes chapters 17-21 of the book of Judges. Very possibly the book of Ruth could be considered in the appendix. As a matter of fact, in ancient Hebrew Bibles, we pointed out to you that the book of Ruth is considered a part of the book of Judges.

You will recall that the apostasies, which we have spent quite a bit of time discussing, going from chapters 3-16, all followed a general course. There were disobediences, when the children of Israel turned to other gods; then there were disciplines, when God turned them over to other nations; and then there were deliverances, when the children of Israel cried out to the Lord, confessing their sins and asking Him to deliver them.

You will recall that those disobediences, disciplines, and deliverances all centered around the lives of individual men, and we have discussed these disciplines and deliverances, beginning with the deliverance provided by Othniel and ending with the deliverance that was provided by Samson.

We are ready to begin the study of that portion of the book which we have labeled “The Appendix.” Keep in mind, when we use the words, “the appendix,” we are not talking about an organ in your body. We are talking about something which the author, the Holy Spirit, added to the body of the book. The appendix in the book of Judges represents certain incidents which occurred during this period, which the Holy Spirit took and put together without regard to chronological sequence in order to emphasize spiritual truth, in order to emphasize the real condition of the people at that particular time.

We are going to find that the appendix, which we are going to consider together, is composed of two parts. There is presented to you the idolatry of Dan, in chapters 17 and 18. Dan, of course, was one of the tribes of Israel. Then there will be discussed for us the immorality of Benjamin in chapters 19-21. You will keep in mind that Benjamin is another of the tribes of the nation of Israel.

The Idolatry of Dan

We want to begin a discussion of the idolatry of Dan, and as we begin this discussion, I would like for you to be reading ahead in this portion of the Word, so that when we are ready to discuss it, it will be very clear to you.

The idolatry of Dan is composed, first of all, of a record of Micah's apostasy, which is given in chapter 17, verses 1-13. The reason that Micah's apostasy is brought to our attention is to remind us that apostasy, as a little leaven, leaventh the whole lot. It eventually seduces the entire nation.

The second portion of this section, which we have labeled, “The Idolatry of Dan,” is going to be related to the appropriation of the inheritance of Dan. The interesting thing to keep in mind is what we suggested at the onset of our discussion, that even though God gave the land of Canaan to Israel and divided it up among the various tribes, all of the tribes did not possess their inheritance. They had not appropriated their inheritance. God was pleased to take Dan and his failure to appropriate his inheritance as an illustration of how it could be a thorn in the side of Israel.

A third portion of this section, we have labeled, “Micah's Idols Confiscated.” This man, Micah, we are going to learn, provided the instruments which led the entire nation of Dan into appostasy and into idolatry.

The Record of Micah's Apostasy

We want to consider with you at the very beginning, if you will go back to Judges, chapter 17, “The Apostasy of Micah.” I would like for you to follow in your Bibles as I read with you this chapter so that we might get all of the information clearly fixed in our minds. Judges, chapter 17, verse 1:

Judges 17

1And there was a man of mount Ephraim, whose name was Micah.
2And he said unto his mother, The eleven hundred shekels of silver that were taken from thee, about which thou cursedst, and spakest of also in mine ears, behold, the silver is with me; I took it. And his mother said, Blessed be thou of the LORD, my son.
3And when he had restored the eleven hundred shekels of silver to his mother, his mother said, I had wholly dedicated the silver unto the LORD from my hand for my son, to make a graven image and a molten image: now therefore I will restore it unto thee.
4Yet he restored the money unto his mother; and his mother took two hundred shekels of silver, and gave them to the founder, who made thereof a graven image and a molten image: and they were in the house of Micah.
5And the man Micah had an house of gods, and made an ephod, and teraphim, and consecrated one of his sons, who became his priest.
6In those days there was no king in Israel, but every man did that which was right in his own eyes.
7And there was a young man out of Bethlehemjudah of the family of Judah, who was a Levite, and he sojourned there.
8And the man departed out of the city from Bethlehemjudah to sojourn where he could find a place: and he came to mount Ephraim to the house of Micah, as he journeyed.
9And Micah said unto him, Whence comest thou? And he said unto him, I am a Levite of Bethlehemjudah, and I go to sojourn where I may find a place.
10And Micah said unto him, Dwell with me, and be unto me a father and a priest, and I will give thee ten shekels of silver by the year, and a suit of apparel, and thy victuals. So the Levite went in.
11And the Levite was content to dwell with the man; and the young man was unto him as one of his sons.
12And Micah consecrated the Levite; and the young man became his priest, and was in the house of Micah.
13Then said Micah, Now know I that the LORD will do me good, seeing I have a Levite to my priest.

This is the story, and I think it is clear to you from the reading of it, so we will not attempt to make any resume of the story itself. We try to learn the various lessons that we can which will teach us how to guard against drifting into apostasy, because I would like to suggest to you that nobody goes into apostasy suddenly. Nobody just deliberately walks off into apostasy, if they have known anything about the Lord at all. It is a matter of drifting off into it.

Drifting Into Apostasy

The first thing that I would like to call to your attention may be learned as a lesson from the names which are in our story. These names will suggest to us how easy it is just to slip off into apostasy before we hardly realize it is happening to us. The first name that is brought to our attention is the name “Micah.” “Micah” is a contraction of another word, miykayhuw , which means “one who is like Jehovah.” This was Micah's name originally. He was called Miykayhuw . As we have pointed out to you repeatedly, parents in the Old Testament gave their children names sometimes in a prophetic sense, because they could speak with the spirit of prophecy, and it would indicate what the child would be like. Sometimes they named them names hopefully, hoping they would be what their names implied. We know, of course, what happened here. Probably the parents of Miykayhuw , when he was born, gave him this name, saying, “We want him to be godlike. We want him to be a godly man,” but as you can tell from the act of his mother, she had slipped first. Then he slipped, and his name was contracted into the word “Micah,” which means, “one who is dull of sight.”

This is always true of people who do not walk in the light. This is always true of people who walk against truth. They become dull of sight. They become spiritually blind, and being spiritually blind, they are not able to see truth. Oftentimes, because of the veil that is over their eyes, the Devil is able to dupe them, for he does clothe himself as an angel of light. He is able to cause them to think that falsehood is truth instead of truth being truth.

Departing From a Godly Heritage

There is another lesson, I think, we can learn from the names which are in this story that indicates what I am saying to you. It is easy to slip into apostasy and we should always be on our guard. Will you glance down there to verse 7, where you will read:

Judges 17

7And there was a young man out of Bethlehemjudah of the family of Judah, who was a Levite, and he sojourned there.

I want you to notice the word “sojourned,” as I suggest to you that some of the original translations do not translate the word “he sojourned there.” Rather, they translate it “son of Gershom.” This, in my opinion, is the better translation in the light of what we are going to learn in the last part of the chapter. Keep in mind, this Levite was of the tribe of Levi, which means that he was dedicated to the priesthood, but all through the story he is not identified by name. When we come to chapter 18 of this portion of the Word, the last paragraph, and after the tribe of Dan had confiscated the idols of Micah, in verse 30, we find a priest named; and if we didn't have what has gone on before we might think that the tribe of Dan had gotten them another priest. Then we would not have known what had happened to this particular one.

But we read in verse 30 of chapter 18:

Judges 18

30And the children of Dan set up the graven image: and Jonathan, the son of Gershom, the son of Manasseh, he and his sons were priests to the tribe of Dan until the day of the captivity of the land.

As we anticipate ourselves a bit, you'll find the tribe of Dan went to the house of Micah and persuaded this Levite to leave the house of Micah and go with them and be a priest for the whole tribe. In view of that fact, I suggest to you that in verse 7 of chapter 17, a better translation of the phrase “he sojourned there,” is “son of Gershom.”

This Levite, who became Micah's priest, to say for our immediate discussion, was the son of Gershom. That way we can identify him with the Jonathan of the last paragraph of chapter 18; and if we are able to do that, we learn a new lesson, because “Jonathan” means “Jehovah has given.” Here again we picture the family into which Jonathan was born, a family of Levi. A son was born, and the parents immediately gave him a name. What was that name? Jonathan. What did it mean? “God has given us a son,” “God has given us someone to be dedicated to His service.” Instead of dedicated to His service, he was being used to begin the foundation for the idolatry of Dan.

A very interesting thing to me is that the statement you find in the last part of chapter 18, verse 30, which refers to the son of Gershom, the son of Manasseh, is that the phrase, “the son of Manasseh,” in the very ancient manuscripts is translated “a son of Moses.” This is significant because it means that Jonathan was one of the grandsons or great-grandsons of Moses, the second or third generation from Moses the lawgiver, the great prophet of God, the individual who had led the nation of Israel out of Egypt and into some of the deep experiences of God. The grandson or great-grandson of Moses was the leader of the idolatry of Dan. It is almost unbelievable that individuals so closely related to the Lord could slip so far away from God. Yet we must recognize that such can be the case, and such is the case, and we are seeing it in our day all too often, certainly in a way that we wish we did not have to recognize. There are sons of preachers today–preachers, mighty men of God, who did indeed stand as great bastions of the faith–and now their sons and their grandsons are counted among the liberal theologians of our day. It is a sad thing, but it indicates that a godly heritage is not necessarily a guarantee of fundamental, Bible-centered teaching.

There is another lesson that I think it would be good for us to learn in a general way. As we have learned a lesson from names of individuals in this passage of Scripture relative to how easy it is to slip off into idolatry, I would like for us to learn a lesson from the places. Go back to chapter 17, and we read there:

Judges 17

1And there was a man of mount Ephraim, whose name was Micah.

Why is the word “Ephraim” of importance to us in our discussion? The answer is that Ephraim was the place that Shiloh was located, and Shiloh was the place where the Temple of God was located. If you will look at chapter 18, verse 31, you will read:

Judges 18

31And they set them up Micah's graven image, which he made, all the time that the house of God was in Shiloh.

If the house of God for some reason had been torn down, if worship in the house of God had been forbidden as it is in some countries today, then there might have been some reason for people being misled, being deceived into following the pathway of apostasy, but such was not the case. Side by side with Shiloh, the house of God, was the center of idolatry in the tribe of Dan. I call attention to lessons of places to your mind to remind you that distance is not necessarily a determining factor in spirituality. Oftentimes individuals will say, “I was completely out of touch with the Word; I was completely out of touch with any source of spiritual training and spiritual truths. This is the reason that I slid away.” That does enter into it. It's not necessarily a conclusive argument, because it is possible to be right close to the house of God at Shiloh and set up your own shrine in your own heart and slide far from the plain teaching of God's Word.

I would like for us to notice in chapter 17 of Judges that there are illustrated three characteristics of apostasy. All apostasy, regardless of the age in which you find it, is characterized by three things. All apostasy, whether it is individual or corporate, is characterized by three things that you find here in chapter 17.

The Combination of Opposing Principles

The first thing that I would suggest to you is what I have described to you as “the combination of opposing principles.” When people try to combine principles which are opposed one to the other, you find the beginning of apostasy. Now let us reread these first five verses and see if we can determine what we are talking about:

Judges 17

1And there was a man of mount Ephraim, whose name was Micah.
2And he said unto his mother, The eleven hundred shekels of silver that were taken from thee, about which thou cursedst, and spakest of also in mine ears, behold, the silver is with me; I took it. And his mother said, Blessed be thou of the LORD, my son.
3And when he had restored the eleven hundred shekels of silver to his mother, his mother said, I had wholly dedicated the silver unto the LORD from my hand for my son, to make a graven image and a molten image: now therefore I will restore it unto thee.
4Yet he restored the money unto his mother; and his mother took two hundred shekels of silver, and gave them to the founder, who made thereof a graven image and a molten image: and they were in the house of Micah.
5And the man Micah had an house of gods, and made an ephod, and teraphim, and consecrated one of his sons, who became his priest.

Do you see, as I have read this paragraph, why I suggest to you that the combination of opposing principles is the first step in apostasy? Here was a woman who had saved up or possessed eleven hundred shekels of silver. Some people think maybe this was Delilah, because she did get eleven hundred shekels of silver for betraying Samson; and Samson, you will remember, was of the tribe of Dan. Some folk wonder if maybe Micah might have been her son. I don't know, but I do know that she had this eleven hundred shekels of silver; and in that day, as in this day, the children were not opposed to stealing from their parents. Micah stole the eleven hundred shekels of silver, and he was going along very nicely until the word got out that his mother had pronounced a curse upon the man who had stolen the money. That frightened him because they were living without the Word in a superstitious atmosphere, and he thought the curse might come true. So he took the eleven hundred shekels of silver to his mother and said, “Mother, I am the one that stole the money.” Now she was in a real fix. She didn't want that curse to come down on her son, so she pronounced a blessing upon him, and said, “Blessed be thou my son,” thinking that a blessing would outweigh the curse.

There you have a suggestion that oftentimes people feel that evil that is done in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ is justified because she said, when he had restored the money to her, “Son, I have decided that I am going to dedicate this money to God. Really what I am going to do is give it back to you so that you can have an image made with which you can worship Jehovah.” She felt that that would right the wrong because the image was going to be used in the worship of the Lord, this despite the fact that the commandment very definitely forbade making a graven image. She wasn't interested in what the Word of God said. She was interested in doing something in the name of the Lord and saying that if it is done in the name of the Lord, it is all right.

A lot of people today will say, “Don't tell me what the Word of God says; just tell me what is wrong with what I am doing if I am doing it for Jesus.” A lot of things are being done in the name of Jesus today which are done by apostates, men who do not stand true to the Word of God. I beg of you, do not think for a moment that everything that is done in the name of Jesus is necessarily right, and don't think for a moment that just because you do it in the name of Jesus it is right if it violates the principles of the Word.

Glance down at verse 13, and notice, as we anticipate ourselves somewhat, that Micah had convinced Jonathan to be his priest, and he said:

Judges 17

13Then said Micah, Now know I that the LORD will do me good, seeing I have a Levite to my priest.

As we are going to learn, Jonathan had no business accepting the job. Just because he was a Levite didn't mean that God was going to bless a man who was living in a wrong way.

Let us recognize that one of the first steps of apostasy is the combination of opposing principles–that is, thinking that if you do something evil in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ, you are justified in doing it.

Token Service Unacceptable

One other thing that we would call to your attention is the opposing principles of thinking that complete surrender can be discharged by a token service. A great many people feel that way. Did you notice when we read the story that his mother said, in verse 3, “I had wholly dedicated the silver unto the Lord. All of the eleven hundred pieces of it, every single one of them, I had dedicated unto the Lord.” That sounded real good, but when it came to the discharge of the duty, notice verse 4. His mother took two hundred shekels of silver and gave them to the founder. We have already said that the matter of making idols was wrong, but still to say that you are going to give God eleven hundred pieces of silver and give Him only two hundred is wrong, too. Yet an apostate has a way of thinking that complete surrender can be discharged by token service. In other words, apostates are not necessarily men of the Word.

The third thing that I would like to bring to your attention in this connection will be emphasized if we look at verse 5:

Judges 17

5And the man Micah had an house of gods, and made an ephod, and teraphim, and consecrated one of his sons, who became his priest.

This Scripture brings to our attention that worship is acceptable as long as it is worship. Maybe I should rephrase that so that I'll not be misquoted. It brings to our mind the mistaken idea that worship is acceptable so long as it is worship. Micah was worshiping Jehovah–remember that–and God had very plainly said that when men approached Him, they could not approach him using any kind of images related to the things of Heaven above or in the earth beneath. God also said that when Israel comes into the land, there shall be one place of worship, and that will be at Shiloh.

Micah said, “Oh, I don't know that it matters really. We're worshiping God. Why should it matter whether you worship at Shiloh or at home?” So he created a house of gods in his own residence–a shrine, a chapel, if you please–in his own house, contrary to the plain commandments of the Lord. He put into that house the graven image which his mother had made for him out of those two hundred shekels of silver. A graven image is an image that is made out of wood and covered with silver. He had a molten image, which his mother also had made out of those two hundred shekels of silver. A molten image is exactly what the term implies, one that is poured out of silver into a mold.

In addition to these two images which he had in his own shrine, he had an ephod. Remember Gideon, before he died, was into making an ephod. An ephod was a vest, sometimes made out of linen, sometimes made out of something else, which priests and prophets and kings wore. When the priest wore it, it was supposed to have a special power of divination, because in it was kept the urim and the thummim by which the priest determined the will of God. It was only supposed to be made by God's specifications. But these men made it to their own liking, and said, “Ah well, it doesn't matter. We are worshiping God, aren't we?”

So we see graven images, molten images, ephod, and then there were teraphim. “Teraphim” is a plural word which describes little household gods that took care of the various phases of the household–a kitchen god, a bedroom god, etc., different ones. They were all in this particular shrine of Micah, and Micah was illustrating the principle that many people accept today, that worship is acceptable as long as it is worship. Sometimes individuals will say, when you say something about erroneous practices in connection with people's contact with God, “Oh, what difference does that make? They love God, don't they? They are doing what God wants them to do, so why worry about the little details?” This is the way apostasy begins. Don't worry about what men call the little details, and you are on the road to apostasy.

Situation Ethics

I said that there were three characteristics of apostasy. One of them we have already looked at. That was the matter of combining the principles that oppose each other, mixing good and evil, mixing idolatry with reality, etc. The second characteristic is very simply stated in a very modern expression. Are you keeping up with “situation ethics?” Have you heard that phrase? Well, if you have read very much, you have seen it. Very simply explained, it means that the ethics, the principles of action, are determined by the situation. Is it ever right to tell a lie? Situation ethics says there are certain situations which arise when it is all right to tell a lie. Some such foolish, hypothetical situation is brought to mind, where you are told if a man with a gun said, “Is your child in the house? I want to kill him.”, you would be justified because of the situation to lie and say, “No, my child is not in the house.” That's a situation which justifies a lie.

Young ladies are told, for example, that they may be in certain situations in which it is quite all right to commit adultery, and God will not frown upon it. It is situation ethics. They are told, for example, if a young man has some very pressing sexual needs, this young lady has permitted him to be somewhat familiar, it is all right for her to surrender herself to him. The situation demands it, and if she doesn't do it, she is doing wrong instead of good.

You can see how this is in direct contradiction to the Word of God. God says, “Thou shalt not lie. Thou shalt not commit adultery.” We could go on with many, many, many illustrations, but this will suffice. Situation ethics says you don't need to pay attention to that if a situation justifies what you want to do.

Where in the world do I find situation ethics in Judges, chapter 17? Glance down there at verse 6 and you will find it expressed in a little different language, but it is there, nevertheless:

Judges 17

6In those days there was no king in Israel, but every man did that which was right in his own eyes.

Notice the phrase, “every man did that which was right in his own eyes.” That is situation ethics expressed in Old Testament language. If you think it's all right to do it, then it is all right to do it. As long as I don't see anything wrong with it, it's all right. Beloved, this is the characteristic of apostasy, and you can see why it is. It rules out the authority of the Word of God. The individual who endorses situation ethics is the individual who says, in so many words, “I don't care what the Bible says. It doesn't matter what the Bible says. It's the way I feel about the thing.” When people come to me for counsel, I open the Word of God, I give them the Word; I say, “Look at it; here it is. It is not my opinion. It doesn't matter what I think; here it is.” How many times have I been told, “Oh, that is your interpretation of it, and I believe I can do what I think is right.” This is situation ethics.

A Materialistic Ministry

The third characteristic of apostasy is something that perhaps I, as a minister, would feel better if I didn't have to mention. But I have to preach the Word, and to be perfectly honest, I must mention it. I must draw to your attention that one of the characteristics of apostasy is a “materialistic ministry.” When I am talking about ministry here, I am talking about the servants of God. I am talking about the preachers, the pastors, the evangelists, the Bible teachers, ministers of God as the term commonly accepted. A materialistic ministry is one of the three characteristics of apostasy.

You are well on your way to apostasy when the ministry spends its time as the Levite spent his time, looking for a place, or perhaps more accurately, looking for a job. Look down at Judges, chapter 17, verse 8:

Judges 17

8And the man departed out of the city from Bethlehemjudah to sojourn where he could find a place [the word ”place” is in italics. It means it is not in the original text, and instead of ”place,” you could use ”job,” ”a place of service”] and he came to mount Ephraim to the house of Micah, as he journeyed.

You say, “What's wrong with looking for a job, looking for a place of ministry?” The thing that was wrong in this case was that every Levite was placed throughout the nation of Israel in strategic positions so that there would be a Levite for every given number of Israelites so that spiritual needs might be met properly.

In other words, God placed the Levites. He had no need for looking for a place of service. God evidently had placed him in Bethlehemjudah. For some reason, he did not like what he found in Bethlehemjudah. In modern terms, maybe the pay wasn't high enough. Maybe the interest wasn't great enough, and he decided he would look for a new place. When a minister becomes so materialistically minded that he's not content to serve in the place that God would have him serve, he is on the way to apostasy.

The great apostasy that we are facing right at this particular time, I think as much as anything else, can be laid at the door of those who call themselves ministers. They are not interested in seeking a call from God, being in the place that God has put them, they are constantly looking for a place of service. The materialism with which they are tainted is indicated oftentimes by measuring materialistic gain versus spiritual opportunity.

The Surrender of Principles

Let's just suppose that the Levite had a good reason to leave Bethlehemjudah when he came to the home of Micah. He should have been interested in the spiritual blessing. Was he? Well look down at verse 9:

Judges 17

9And Micah said unto him, Whence comest thou? And he said unto him, I am a Levite of Bethlehemjudah, and I go to sojourn where I may find a place [he was looking for a job] .

My, what a difference there might have been, if he had said, “I'm a Levite. I do not have any place of service, but I am looking for a place where I can be a great blessing.” Micah responded in verse 10, “Dwell with me, and be unto me a father and a priest to me.” If Micah had said, “Let me see. Is there a real need or is there some needier field?” There is no record of that. The conversation centered around material gain. I would not be at all surprised if Micah, when he asked him to stay, was faced with the question, “What kind of salary do you pay?” For the very next thing Micah said in verse 10 was, “I will give thee ten shekels of silver by the year, and a suit of apparel and all thy food.”

That may not seem like very much to you right now, but believe me, in that day, that was plenty. A change of apparel once a year may not seem like much to you, but it was a lot, and all of his food plus ten shekels of silver. It was a big salary. The Levite, because of a materialistic mind, immediately accepted the position, and we find something in verse 11 that is so characteristic of a materialistic ministry. Perhaps it's a result rather than a cause, for you read in verse 11:

Judges 17

11And the Levite was content to dwell with the man; and the young man was unto him as one of his sons.

The Levite took the job, and we read that he was content to dwell with the man. On the surface that doesn't seem like very much, but I would like to suggest that you look at that word “content.” As I would remind you that when the Levite accepted this job, he surrendered his principles, for the word “content” comes from the Hebrew word yaal , which means “a surrender of a will.” When the Levite hired out for money, he surrendered all of his principles. He surrendered his will.

I want to say to you, Beloved, when a minister can be hired for money, he surrenders his will because he is going to bring a message, not that God orders him to bring, but he is going to bring the message these people want to hear, and materialistically-minded is the man who becomes a man with no principles, surrendering his will. He becomes a hired hand of those who hire him.

Conclusion

This is the characteristic of the apostasy of our day, for so many of our churches are filled today with preachers who do not declare the whole counsel of God. They declare what they believe a few want to hear. It is sad, but it is the result of apostasy. So I would remind you that apostasy is not something that happens suddenly. It is something that well-meaning people drift into without realizing it.


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