Moses' Parents
Tim Temple

Introduction

Our text is Exodus, chapter 2, beginning with verse 1:

Exodus 2:

1 And there went a man of the house of Levi, and took to wife a daughter of Levi.
2 And the woman conceived, and bare a son: and when she saw him that he was a goodly child, she hid him three months.
3 And when she could not longer hide him, she took for him an ark of bulrushes, and daubed it with slime and with pitch, and put the child therein; and she laid it in the flags by the river's brink.
4 And his sister stood afar off, to wit what would be done to him.
5 And the daughter of Pharaoh came down to wash herself at the river; and her maidens walked along by the river's side; and when she saw the ark among the flags, she sent her maid to fetch it.
6 And when she had opened it, she saw the child: and, behold, the babe wept. And she had compassion on him, and said, This is one of the Hebrews' children.
7 Then said his sister to Pharaoh's daughter, Shall I go and call to thee a nurse of the Hebrew women, that she may nurse the child for thee?
8 And Pharaoh's daughter said to her, Go. And the maid went and called the child's mother.
9 And Pharaoh's daughter said unto her, Take this child away, and nurse it for me, and I will give thee thy wages. And the women took the child, and nursed it.
10 And the child grew, and she brought him unto Pharaoh's daughter, and he became her son. And she called his name Moses: and she said, Because I drew him out of the water.

The two most important people in anyone's life are his parents. Parents have a long-lasting effect even in subconscious ways that often we do not realize the impact of until much later in our own lives. Many times we never realize the full impact. God has so ordered it that the family is one of His institutions for the preservation of the human race.

One of the real problems that faces our nation today is the fact that we are neglecting and ignoring as a nation the importance of the family unit; and so as we study the life of an individual, no biography would be complete without careful attention to the details of the parents of that individual or those who took the place of his parents were his own parents not available. This is emphasized by the fact that God specifically includes information about Moses' parents. As you can see from the book of Exodus, before we ever get into the details of the life story of this man, we have part of a chapter devoted to his parents and to the kind of people they were. We want to concentrate not on Moses himself, but on Moses' parents as we think about the life of Moses.

We have divided this study into three parts. We want to think about Moses' parents from three standpoints. First, in verse 1, we want to notice Moses' heritage, and then in verses 2-3, Moses' hiding, and then in verses 4-10, the helpers that God provided for Moses. We want to use these three things to center our thinking and to build our thoughts around.

Moses' Heritage

First, notice in verse 1, his heritage. This is one of those verses that we sometimes pass over quickly without giving much thought to. Notice verse 1:

Exodus 2:

1 And there went a man of the house of Levi, and took to wife a daughter of Levi.

Our first impression of that verse might be that it is just the beginning of a sentence and it doesn't mean much, but really this information is not wasted at all. There is not a single word of wasted information in the Scripture. Actually, this information is to give us a very important detail about this man whom God was going to use so extensively in later life. It is very important for us to notice this information about his parents concerning the fact that they were of the house of Levi. Notice in verse 1 that the father was of the house of Levi, and he married a woman who was from the house of Levi.

If you are familiar with the history of Israel, you will know that it was the tribe of Levi that was later to be the tribe delegated to be involved in the priestly activities. Before that time, Moses' parents were part of that tribe because, at the time in which Moses was born, that tribe had not been singled out; but by comparing scriptural history, we can see that the tribe of Levi was the tribe that God used in various ways throughout the history of Israel even before they were set aside as the priestly tribe.

Moses' parents' names are given in chapter 6, verse 20: Amram and Jochebed. At the particular time that this passage is describing, Moses' parents were individuals who were still true to God at a time when many of their contemporaries were turning away from Jehovah, as the chapter is going to illustrate.

Turn to the book of Joshua and look at chapter 24. Joshua records many years later, looking back on this period of history in which Moses was born, a very important fact of which we need to be very aware. Joshua is preaching to his people after they have been delivered from their Egyptian bondage and after they had wandered in the wilderness and as they were getting ready to go into the promised land. You can see that it was many years after the death of Moses, but looking back on that period of time when Moses was born, Joshua says, in verse 14:

Joshua 24:

14 Now therefore fear the LORD, and serve him in sincerity and in truth: [notice] and put away the gods which your fathers served on the other side of the flood, and in Egypt; and serve ye the LORD.

Notice that last word in the verse being in capital letters, which indicates that it is a translation of the Hebrew word Jehovah , which is the summary name for God in the Hebrew. Joshua is saying to the people: “Your forefathers, when they were slaves in Egypt, worshiped other gods, and you must not do that.”

As we go back to Exodus, chapter 2, it is very important for us to know that Amram and Jochebed were individuals who were individually and personally true worshipers of Jehovah at a time when many of their contemporaries were worshiping the Egyptian gods. I don't need to emphasize the lesson, which is a very important one: If you are going to be used of God, and if you are going to raise children who will be used of God, you may have to go against the grain. You may have to be different from those around you. You may have to be true to the Lord when most others are not being true to the Lord. These are the kind of people whom God can use as parents. These are the kind of people whom God can use to produce men that He can use.

This was Moses' heritage. He was from a family who stood with the Lord and walked with the Lord, and so it should not be too surprising the way his life develops as we go along.

Moses' Hiding

The second thing we want to think about is Moses' hiding . In verse 2, Moses' parents, being godly people, had to take a step of faith:

Exodus 2:

2 And the woman conceived, and bare a son: and when she saw him that he was a goodly child, she hid him three months.

Notice the phrase, goodly child . We again read through this verse and we think that is just background information and is not important, and many times we read right through it, but it is important for us to notice very carefully what this verse is saying because it is a key to a number of things that were true in the life of Moses.

I have yet to meet parents who do not react in the way that this verse seems to say Moses' parents reacted. They looked at the child and said, “He is a goodly child.” Most parents think that. My parents think that of me; I think that of my children; you think that of your children. Regardless of what the rest of us think about your children, or regardless of what you think about my children, we all think that our children are pretty special, that they are goodly children. However, this phrase, goodly child , in verse 2, is something more than just the normal pride that parents take in their children, whether anyone else does or not.

Turn to the book of Hebrews. This phrase, goodly child , is explained for us in Hebrews. There are several things in chapter 11 that we can point out from this one passage. Let me remind you that Hebrews, chapter 11, is what we refer to as the great faith chapter . There we have a summary of many acts of faith that people of God did. Included in chapter 11, is a summary of the life story of Moses. Notice verse 23:

Hebrews 11:

23 By faith Moses, when he was born, was hid three months of his parents, because they saw [now notice] he was a proper child; and they were not afraid of the king's commandment.

They saw that he was a proper child. The other reference is Acts, chapter 7, verse 20, and that verse uses the same phrase, proper child . The significance of that is that the word proper is the translation of a Greek word which more literally means “beautiful in God's sight.” So in Hebrews, chapter 11, we read that Moses' parents hid him because they saw that he was a child who was beautiful in God's sight. It wasn't just that they thought he was beautiful, but they recognized that God saw that he was beautiful. Really, this is not just a reference to physical beauty because the idea of beauty that is conveyed in the Greek word there is the idea of the beauty of something that is what it ought to be. In other words, Moses' parents somehow saw that this was a child that God was going to use.

The Revised Standard version translates this verse: “He was beautiful before God.” The idea is that he was a child that met God's requirements, not that he was sinlessly perfect because all have sinned and come short of the glory of God, but God had prepared this child to be used in a special way. Somehow his parents recognized that. In verse 23, his parents hid him by faith: “By faith Moses was hidden three months of his parents.”

This statement that they did it by faith is very significant. It is also significant that we find it in this particular chapter because, as I mentioned before, Hebrews, chapter 11, is the great faith chapter. The whole point of Hebrews, chapter 11, is that faith is acting on what God has said. The chapter begins:

Hebrews 11:

1 Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen.

What is faith? Faith is hearing something that God has said and hoping for that thing, not being able to see it but acting as if it were true or acting on it because we know it is true. A very simple illustration of that is the matter of salvation through Jesus Christ. We are saved by faith, the Scripture tells us. We are saved by faith in what Christ has done. When we hear the message of the Gospel, we can't prove that in a laboratory experiment. There is no way to verify for you that Jesus Christ died on the Cross; even historically that cannot be verified. There are many references to it, but there is no way for me to absolutely prove to you that Jesus Christ died on the Cross. More particularly, even though that can be verified historically, whether it can be proven or not, it cannot be proven that when He died, He died with our sins in mind. Faith is the fact that God's Word tells us that He died with our sins in mind. God gives us the strength to believe that and to step out as though it were true and commit our eternal destiny into the hands of Jesus Christ, into the work that Jesus Christ did on the Cross according to the record of the Scripture. That is what faith is.

It is important for us to understand the concept of faith because a lot of people have a wrong conception of faith. A lot of things get blamed on faith that are really not faith at all. Faith is not saying that we need a bigger building at Abilene Bible Church or a new house or a new car, and we are just going to trust God that He will give it to us. That is not faith; that is hope. Hope is a wonderful thing, and hope is something that the Holy Spirit produces; but faith is seeing something that God has said and saying, “I believe that,” even though that cannot be verified experientially, stepping out on that as though it had been proven already. Over and over again in Hebrews, chapter 11, we see examples of that—men who heard God's promise and said, “I believe that,” and went ahead and acted on it, even though there was no way to verify it, humanly speaking. That's what faith is. It is important for us to understand what faith is.

Moses' parents hid him by faith. Let's think about that for a minute. The same point is made in Romans, chapter 10, verse 17:

Romans 10:

17 So then faith cometh by hearing, and hearing by the word of God.

Notice what the statement says. It does not say that faith comes by desiring something and just believing that God is sweet enough to do that for us, just believing that that is the kind of thing that God ought to do for us because we are living faithfully for Him. No! Faith is hearing something God has said through His Word and believing that and stepping out on it.

In one way or another, since that is what Scripture says that faith consists of, even though we don't have a record of it in the Scripture, we must understand that evidently somewhere along the line, Moses' parents understood that God was going to deliver them from slavery. We've already talked together about Genesis, chapter 15, where God said: “Abraham, the day will come when I am going to give you this land, but before I give you this land you are standing on and looking at, your descendants are going to be in slavery for 400 years because the iniquity of the Amorites is not yet full.” That is a very important concept related to that of the cup of iniquity. God had said, “This land will be yours, but first must come a time of slavery.”

Again, we do not have a specific record of it in the Scripture, but it is easy to understand that Abraham probably told his children about this. We believe that there was a great body of oral teaching that was handed down by word of mouth from Adam and Eve and right on down. Before the Scripture was written out, before the Canon was complete, there was probably a great deal that was transmitted just by word of mouth from generation to generation. It is very possible that Moses' parents had heard that God had promised to Abraham that they were going to be in slavery, but they were going to be delivered. It is very possible that they calculated that period of time and knew that that period of slavery was nearly up and that somehow God indicated to them that their son would be the one who God would use.

That sounds a little farfetched, doesn't it? Can you imagine how farfetched it must have seemed to Amram and Jochebed as they were hearing it because remember, they had not heard this story in Sunday School over and over again. It was the first time they had understood these things, and yet God indicated that their son was a proper child, a special child in God's sight, and they acted in faith. They stepped out on what God had said even though they had no way of proving that it was true. “By faith,” the Scripture says, “they hid that child.” That was a tremendous step of faith.

As we go back to Exodus, chapter 2, remembering that the New Testament enlightens about the fact that they did this in faith, we can see that demonstrated in Exodus, chapter 2, but the record of the New Testament specifies that they hid the child by faith. So it was a step of faith.

A Straining of Faith

In Exodus, chapter 2, verse 3, notice something even more important. It is what we are going to refer to as a straining of faith . Notice verse 3:

Exodus 2:

3 And when she could not longer hide him, she took for him an ark of bulrushes, and daubed it with slime and with pitch, and put the child therein; and she laid it in the flags [the bulrushes or the weeds] by the river's brink.

It would have taken a great deal of faith to hide a child whom the king had ordered put to death. Remember in an earlier study, we talked about the fact that the Pharaoh, because he was afraid of an insurrection by the Israelites who were multiplying so rapidly, had issued an edict that any male Hebrew child should be put to death. Remember, there were those who feared God more than they did the king, and they were willing to disobey the king's order. Moses' parents evidently were among those.

It would have taken a great deal of faith, don't you imagine, to keep a child, a newborn baby hidden who had been ordered to be put to death? But sometimes a step of faith is not all that God asks. There are probably, in a group this size, people who have taken some step of faith, and it has been a strain for you to do that. It has been a real test of your relationship with the Lord, but you have done that. You have stepped out by faith and things have not gone like you thought. Instead of the problem being immediately solved, instead of things immediately getting better, perhaps what has happened to you is what happened to Moses' parents. They took a step of faith and hid the baby, but God didn't solve their problem immediately. In fact, the problem got worse because whether they had thought it through in advance or not, the child kept growing and growing, and in verse 3, the time came when they could no longer hide him.

We don't know why she could no longer hide him. Maybe he had gotten to where he cried so loud she couldn't keep him quiet any more, but for some reason it was impossible to hide the baby at home any longer, so she had to take an even bigger step of faith.

As you determine to walk with the Lord and to take whatever steps of faith He may direct you to take, will you remember that God sometimes directs us to take more than one step of faith? Sometimes the second step of faith that He directs us to take is a much more straining situation than the first step. It is clearly taught in the Scripture that it is only as you take that first step that you will have the strength to take that second step, and it is only as you take that second step that you will have the strength to take the third step. Each step that you take gives you something else with which to account about God as He asks you to take further steps along the way. Don't hesitate to take that first step just because I am telling you that He may ask you to take a second and more difficult step. Don't hesitate if you are poised on the brink of taking that second step; don't hesitate to take that third step just because I am telling you from the Scripture that the third step may be more difficult than the second. Each step of faith is something that God can use to build your relationship with Himself so that the day may come when He may ask you to do something that, from a human standpoint, would be totally impossible; but from the information that you have gained and by the relationship that you have developed with Him by taking these other steps by faith, you will be able to do it. You will be able to step out on faith and do something that even you yourself might never have believed you could have done in response to God's leading.

The second step of faith here in verse 3 is something that would have been very difficult to do, if not impossible. Can you imagine yourself in a situation like this? Most of us are parents. Think about having to take a baby and make a little boat and put that baby in a homemade boat and hide it in the weeds at the edge of the river. It was a step of faith to hide him within the home, but now the time came when she had to hide him in a more difficult way. Remember, all of this was necessary because of a sinful edict of a rebellious king, but as in chapter 1, verse 17, Moses' parents feared the Lord more than they feared the king. The lesson is stressed again that the fear of God brings great courage with men. Moses' parents were willing to take these strange steps of faith because of their relationship to God.

Let me point out something else that is not specifically stated in the Scripture, but I think it is implied from what we know of the Scripture as a whole. I believe that Moses' later usefulness to God was because of the faith he had seen exhibited in the lives of his parents. Child training involves so much more than just physical provision. Moses was in a place of great physical affluence and great comfort because of the way God ordered things, but God also saw to it that his own parents were able to do a great deal of the training. It was a unique situation at best, but I feel sure that as time went by, Moses heard this story about this baby in the ark in the bulrushes just like we tell our children the story. Don't you think you would tell your son if he was the actual baby in the ark? We tell it to our kids about somebody else's baby. Surely if it were our child that had been in the ark, we would tell him the story.

Moses had probably heard this story a number of times as he was growing up, and so as Moses heard his parents say, “Moses there are going to be times when you are going to have to trust God, and you won't even know what the outcome is going to be,” he could identify mentally with the fact that these people knew what they were talking about because they had done it.

May I say to you parents that the most effective child training is that which our children see in our lives as parents. It is one thing to talk about the principles of God's Word with our children, but it is another thing to see those principles demonstrated. In my own personal upbringing, this is the thing that I think was the most impressive of all the things my parents said and of all the principles of child-training that they exhibited. They even had some phrases and catch words that I didn't particularly like, and I was not even sure until I was a parent that I agreed with. It is amazing how wise your parents seem after you have children yourself. As my parents told me even those things that I did not like to hear, the impressive part was that I knew they knew of what they spoke because I heard them talk about the Lord, and I saw them walk by faith, and I knew that they knew by experience what they were trying to teach me by example. There is nothing more valuable for our children to see than our godly lives, and if we as parents are going to pray about something, the thing to do is to pray that God would give us the kind of walk with Himself that would teach our children what they ought to be. I am convinced that Moses was the exceptional man of God that he became because of this incident and others like it when his parents exhibited faith in God.

We hear a great deal about Moses. Amram and Jochebed are not very well known names, but I say that Moses would have never been what God allowed him to be if it had not been for faithful, godly Amram and Jochebed.

Characteristics of Faith

I would like for us to think about a summary of the characteristics of faith that is demonstrated by Amram and Jochebed, these very godly and important people in the Scripture. As we look at their activities in these first verses of Exodus, chapter 2, there is a good summary of what faith really involves. First, as we look at the lives of Moses' parents and their activities, we notice that faith sees. We read in verse 2, and we read in Acts and in Hebrews that Moses' parents saw that he was a goodly child. I want to suggest that faith sees. Faith sees what other people do not see. A person who is willing to take God at His word and step out by faith is a person to whom God is going to reveal things for one thing, but he is a person who is able to see something in the nature of the promises of God, perhaps, that other people do not see. Faith sees.

Turn to II Chronicles, chapter 20, verse 12. This contains the story of King Jehosaphat. He was surrounded by the enemy, and he prayed a very practical prayer. Notice:

II Chronicles 20:

12 O our God, wilt thou not judge them [the enemy]? for we have no might against this great company that cometh against us; neither know we what to do: but our eyes are upon thee.

I love this prayer. Jehosaphat didn't claim to be so godly that he knew exactly what God was going to do. There are times when God has revealed to men what He is going to do, and there are times when we can discern from God's Word what God might do for us in a particular situation, but Jehosaphat was like most of us are most of the time. He was in a crunch, and he didn't know how God would solve that problem. He couldn't imagine what God could do to deliver him, but notice what he said: “Our eyes are upon Thee.” That is a tremendous statement of faith. “Lord, I don't know what to do. I don't know what can be done, but I know you can do something and I am watching You to see You do it.”

Isn't that wonderful? Faith sees. Faith may not see how it is going to be done, or what is going to be done, but faith sees that God can do something. “Neither know we what to do: but our eyes are upon thee.”

In the New Testament, Paul prayed the same way for believers in Ephesus. In Ephesians, chapter 1, verse 18, he prayed that the eyes of their understanding might be opened, might be enlightened—that we would just understand that God can and will do something. Faith sees that God is in control and that God can and will do something.

Secondly, faith acts upon what it sees. Notice that not only did Moses' parents see that he was a special child in God's sight, but they did something about that. Incidentally, the record of Exodus just mentions that Moses' mother hid him. The Bible stories that we tell about Moses in the ark in the bulrushes are usually about his mother, but in Acts, chapter 7, it is specifically mentioned that his father hid him. It is interesting to notice that God gives that father credit also. It was a joint venture between this couple. They saw that this was a special child and that God was going to do something, even though they didn't know exactly what and they did something about that. They took some action. They hid that child in that ark in the weeds. It was a tremendous step of faith. You see, faith not only sees that God can and will do something, but faith is willing to step out and do whatever God may direct in the fulfillment of what He may plan to do. It is not enough to just believe something by faith. We must be willing to act on what God reveals to us by faith also.

We are talking to parents a lot. We are dealing with the story of some parents, but let me use the illustration again in the matter of child-training. Proverbs, chapter 22, verse 6, says:

Proverbs 22:

6 Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it.

This verse is a verse that is going to be full of action. If you are going to train up a child in the way that he should go, it is going to be much more than just saying, “God, take care of this child. I want to raise him for Your glory.” Proverbs, chapter 22, verse 6, involves faith to believe that God can make that child something for His glory, but it also involves taking some action. There are going to be some things that you are going to have to tell your child that he cannot do, and there are going to be some things that you are going to have to tell your child that he must do if you are going to train up a child in the way that he should go.

It is one thing to claim that verse and say, “God, let me train up this child in the way that he should go,” but to claim that verse properly is going to take some action on your part. I think one of the saddest things about our generation and about our society today is that so many parents are claiming Proverbs, chapter 22, verse 6, and then leaving it all up to the baby-sitter or the daycare center or something like that to raise the child. Faith sees that God can do something, but faith acts in response to God's leadership.

A third thing that I think is suggested by Moses' parents concerning the nature of faith in general is that faith is willing to take risks. Faith not only sees, faith not only acts, but faith is willing, if need be, to act in a very risky way, in a very difficult way. To disobey the king's order of chapter 1 would have been a big risk in the first place. Just to keep that baby alive past the second day was a tremendous risk because, obviously, Moses' parents faced the risk of execution themselves by just keeping that baby alive, but to put a three month old baby in a little homemade boat out on the edge of a river was an even bigger risk. Sometimes we are willing to step out by faith and do something that we really believe God is leading us to do. Sometimes we are willing to step out on faith when we don't even know why God would want us to do that or where He might be leading. Sometimes when it comes down to taking a risk to obey God, it becomes more difficult, but the kind of faith that God can use is the kind of faith that is willing to take a risk.

They gave this child up. They said, “This is a child whom God wants to use for His glory. He is a special child; he is a proper child. We will do whatever is necessary to make him available to God.” Incidentally, that principle is true in our own lives, not just with the training of our children. Faith in our own individual lives is a matter of taking a risk as we face the fact that our life belongs to God and that whatever God wants to do with that life, we are going to let Him do. We are going to make ourselves available to God. There may be times when that involves a risk.

Psalm 37, verse 5, says:

Psalm 37:

5 Commit thy way unto the LORD; trust also in him; and he shall bring it to pass.

There may be a time in your life when you are going to have to put yourself in an ark at the edge of the river, and you are just going to have to say, “Lord, I am willing to take this step because I believe it is what I have heard You say. I have some Scripture for it, Lord. It is a difficult thing to do, but my life is not mine. I am going to take whatever risk is necessary.”

Proverbs, chapter 3, verses 5-6, says:

Proverbs 3:

5 Trust in the LORD with all thine heart; and lean not unto thine own understanding.
6 In all thy ways acknowledge him, and he shall direct thy paths.

Faith is willing to take risks. Moses' parents were a man and a woman of faith. They were a man and woman that God greatly used. Think of the rewards that these people will have as they stand before the Lord because of all that their son accomplished for God's glory. As we said, probably none of that would have been accomplished if it were not for their faith and the illustration of their lives that Moses was able to rely on.

Moses' Helpers

We want to notice in verses 4-10, Moses' helpers. Notice in verse 4, one of his helpers used by God was his sister. After the baby was placed in the boat at the edge of the river, we read:

Exodus 2:

4 And his sister stood afar off, to wit what would be done to him.

We have already talked about the fact that it took a great deal of faith to put that three month old baby in the edge of the river, but it would have taken a great deal of faith for a little girl to stand there and watch. I think that it is a very important thing to notice that his sister was willing to cooperate in this plan. That speaks well for the family unity because not only did Moses look back on the faith of his parents, but I am sure that this little girl was willing to participate in this whole plan and take the risk of standing there by the river because of her confidence in her parents and their relationship to the Lord. This was probably specifically part of the plan, and they had decided that this was the way they were going to do it, so one of his helpers was his sister.

Notice another reference to her in verse 7:

Exodus 2:

7 Then said his sister to Pharaoh's daughter, Shall I go and call to thee a nurse of the Hebrew women, that she may nurse the child for thee?

As we go through the story, it is pretty obvious that it had been planned out and that this little girl had a specific role to play. Even though the Scripture doesn't specifically say so, I am sure the parents sat down and planned out this whole scene.

Another of Moses' helpers is what we might refer to as his stepmother. Notice in verse 5:

Exodus 2:

5 And the daughter of Pharaoh came down to wash herself at the river; and her maidens walked along by the river's side; and when she saw the ark among the flags, she sent her maid to fetch it.
6 And when she had opened it, she saw the child: and, behold, the babe wept. And she had compassion on him, and said, This is one of the Hebrews' children.

Tradition says that the Pharaoh who was on the throne at the time that Moses would have been born was one who only had this position because of his marriage to the queen. He was not qualified to rule in his own right, but he was married to the daughter of the previous Pharaoh, so he was the Pharaoh because of his marriage to the heir to the throne. Also, he did not have a son; he only had a daughter. His daughter was going to be in the same position eventually that his wife had been. Either the daughter would have to have a son or marry a man because the Egyptian law was that only a man could sit on the throne. It may have been that this princess was more anxious than normal to find a male to be able to adopt or to marry, so when she came across this male baby, she may have seen in that a solution to her own problems. The only way that she would ever have any authority in the land of Egypt was that she have either a son or a husband who would sit on the throne. If she had neither, then her chance to have any power would be bypassed.

We know, of course, that even though these may have been the human circumstances for her interest in this baby, it was all part of God's overall plan. Isn't it interesting how God takes human circumstances and works them together for the accomplishment of His own purpose?

This was a bold thing for this woman to do because she recognized that he was one of the Hebrew babies. He was one who was supposed to be put to death, and yet the next verses tell us that she kept the child and took him to herself.

In verses 9-10, we have the third helper of Moses, and this is what we refer to as his spiritual parent . We have already been talking about them. These are his real parents. In verse 7, Moses' sister asked if she wanted her to go get a nurse, so in verse 8, we read:

Exodus 2:

8 And Pharaoh's daughter said to her, Go. And the maid went and called the child's mother.

Isn't that lucky? Isn't it amazing that there would be this little girl standing there by the river, and isn't it luck that Pharaoh's daughter would decide to keep the baby instead of killing it? Isn't it lucky that the little girl was there at the right time and was able to go and get her own mother to raise this child? Here is another example of that beautiful doctrine in the Scripture—the doctrine of luck. Isn't all of that lucky? That is wonderful, isn't it?

You realize that I am joking. There is no such thing as the doctrine of luck. This is the sovereignty of God. This is the grace of God. God had planned it all in advance, and He was able to accomplish it because He had people who were willing to go along with His plan and willing to take a risk if necessary to be a part of His plan. Here we have the fulfillment of the whole thing. Moses' parents were willing to take a risk. Moses' sister was willing to take a risk. God arranged the order of life so that Pharaoh's daughter was willing to take a risk, whether it was a step of faith or not. All of these things worked together so that Moses had the comfort and the affluence of the Egyptian palace as well as the instruction of the best teachers that each had to offer. God was able to prepare Moses politically in a perfect way, and yet he was able to have the advantage of being raised by his own godly parents. What a wonderful, sovereign God we have. He saw to it that every detail of Moses' life was taken care of.

Hebrews, chapter 1, tells us that God sends forth His angels to be protection for those who will be the heirs of salvation, and here is another example of that. You see, years and years before the deliverance that God was going to give to His people, God was even protecting the life of the deliverer. Do you think about that? You see, God works far in advance, and I think that has two applications. One is that God may be asking you to take some step of faith now that you may not see the results of for years to come. God may be asking you to take some step of faith now that seems difficult for you and you cannot imagine why it would be important enough that God would want you to take that step. You can't understand why God is ordering the circumstances of your life in the way that He is. Think what would have happened if Amram and Jochebed had responded the way that some of us sometime respond to God's leading. “It is not worth the risk. I can't do that. I might have to give up my child if I did that. I can't take that kind of risk.”

God would have gotten them out of their slavery. God would have accomplished His plan, but God's best would not have been accomplished. God would have had to settle for someone who was not as prepared as Moses was, but God would have worked the situation out because God doesn't need men. God's first plan was to use Moses, the son of Amram and Jochebed.

You may be in the position of Amram and Jochebed, faced with a situation that you can't imagine why God would put you in, faced with ramifications that you can't understand the importance of. Remember that God works far in advance.

The second application is from the other end of the spectrum. You may be in a situation now, and you are like Jehoshaphat and you say, “Lord, I don't know what to do. I am surrounded, but my eyes are upon you.” If you are willing to say, “Lord, I am willing to see what you are going to do.” Remember that God has been working far back down the line in the meeting of your needs. God doesn't work things out overnight like that. Whatever the solution to your problem is, as you step out by faith with God, as you depend upon God to meet your needs, rest assured that God has been working, perhaps even generations back in the lives of others, to prepare for that culmination that He is going to bring into your life.

Conclusion

Moses didn't just appear on the scene from nowhere. Moses was the product of the work of God in the lives of many people. Moses, the deliverer, greatly used of God, was the result of many years of God's careful direction of individuals. God's deliverance of you and God's solutions to your problem has been just as carefully planned and just as lovingly executed, so God help us to take those steps of faith that He directs us to take. God help us to take those steps of faith that He has prepared for us to take as we seek to serve Him.


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