Moses, the Hymn Writer
Tim Temple

Introduction

Our text today is Exodus, chapter 15, verse 1:

Exodus 15:

1 Then sang Moses and the children of Israel this song unto the LORD, and spake, saying, I will sing unto the LORD, for he hath triumphed gloriously: the horse and his rider hath he thrown into the sea.
2 The LORD is my strength and song, and he is become my salvation: he is my God, and I will prepare him an habitation; my father's God, and I will exalt him.
3 The LORD is a man of war: the LORD is his name.
4 Pharaoh's chariots and his host hath he cast into the sea: his chosen captains also are drowned in the Red sea.
5 The depths have covered them: they sank into the bottom as a stone.
6 Thy right hand, O LORD, is become glorious in power: thy right hand, O LORD, hath dashed in pieces the enemy.
7 And in the greatness of thine excellency thou hast overthrown them that rose up against thee: thou sentest forth thy wrath, which consumed them as stubble.
8 And with the blast of thy nostrils the waters were gathered together, the floods stood upright as an heap, and the depths were congealed in the heart of the sea.
9 The enemy said, I will pursue, I will overtake, I will divide the spoil; my lust shall be satisfied upon them; I will draw my sword, my hand shall destroy them.
10 Thou didst blow with thy wind, the sea covered them: they sank as lead in the mighty waters.
11 Who is like unto thee, O LORD, among the gods? who is like thee, glorious in holiness, fearful in praises, doing wonders?
12 Thou stretchedst out thy right hand, the earth swallowed them.
13 Thou in thy mercy hast led forth the people which thou hast redeemed: thou hast guided them in thy strength unto thy holy habitation.
14 The people shall hear, and be afraid: sorrow shall take hold on the inhabitants of Palestina.
15 Then the dukes of Edom shall be amazed; the mighty men of Moab, trembling shall take hold upon them; all the inhabitants of Canaan shall melt away.
16 Fear and dread shall fall upon them; by the greatness of thine arm they shall be as still as a stone; till thy people pass over, O LORD, till the people pass over, which thou hast purchased.
17 Thou shalt bring them in, and plant them in the mountain of thine inheritance, in the place, O LORD, which thou hast made for thee to dwell in, in the Sanctuary, O LORD, which thy hands have established.
18 The LORD shall reign for ever and ever.
19 For the horse of Pharaoh went in with his chariots and with his horsemen into the sea, and the LORD brought again the waters of the sea upon them; but the children of Israel went on dry land in the midst of the sea.

We will stop our reading there with verse 19, which contains the text of the song which Moses wrote, and as we have time, we will consider the remaining verses of the chapter which are comments on the way the song was presented.

Moses was a hymn writer. Moses was a great leader of men. Moses was a great warrior. Moses was a man who knew the LORD personally and intimately. Moses was many things, but an interesting thing to notice is that Moses was also one who was able to praise God in specific detail. Moses was a hymn writer. This incident in the life of Moses took place after the deliverance of their Egyptian slavery had been completed. There is actually no action in this chapter, as you can see by reading through it. Rather, this is a song of praise which is completely devoted to praising God for the deliverance which He gave.

The action of this book picks up after this chapter and the narrative continues with the life of Moses and the activities of the Israelites, but here it is as though the action pauses for a moment for a specific word of praise to God for what He had done. This is a unique passage in the Scripture from several standpoints. First, we should point out that here we have the first poetry in the Bible. There is a great deal of poetry in the Bible, as you know. Most of the book of Psalms is poetry. In The Song of Solomon, the book of Ecclesiastes, the book of Proverbs, we find that many portions of these books are Hebrew poetry. Some of them we recognize as similar to our English type of poetry. Others don't bear quite that resemblance, but they are poetic passages, and here is the first poetry in the Bible. Here, also, is the first reference to singing in the Scripture, and we might point out that we have here the largest choir in all of history before or since. There were probably as many as two million people singing this song, so you can just imagine how great George Beverly Shea would have felt singing with a crusade choir of this size. What a wonderful, beautiful sound they must have made as they sang.

Our purpose in looking at this chapter is to think about the things that it tells us about Moses himself and to think about the things that Moses said about God. This chapter is especially instructive about Moses himself—the fact that he would lead the people in singing a beautiful hymn of praise such as this.

In our last study of the life of Moses, we saw Moses standing before Pharaoh and beginning to demonstrate God's power—and in the chapters that intervened since our last study, God demonstrates His power again and again and again on the Egyptians. I am sure that most of you, if not all of you, are familiar with the story of the book of Exodus, and you know that God miraculously got His people out of their slavery in Egypt. The interesting thing is that Moses was directly and personally involved in all of those miracles. Moses was God's man on the scene. He was the man who stood before Pharaoh again and again. He was the man who mediated between Pharaoh and God.

As we saw in our last lesson, Moses was in a sense a god to Pharaoh. Moses was God's prophet, but he became the power-figure in the life of Pharaoh, so he had been directly and personally involved in all of these things. It would have been very easy for immature people like the Israelites to deify Moses. For example, notice in chapter 14, verse 31:

Exodus 14:

31 And Israel saw that great work which the LORD did upon the Egyptians: and the people feared the LORD, and believed the LORD,[notice] and his servant Moses.

That is written very clearly to indicate to us that Moses had a place of very high esteem in the eyes and the minds of the people. They feared the Lord. They believed the Lord and His servant, Moses. There is a sense in which these verses are telling us that the people put Moses on the same level with God, and it would have been a very simple, small step from that to beginning to worship and deify Moses, but it is interesting to notice that Moses gives all of the glory to God. There is no reference in this hymn to anything that Moses had done. There is no reference to any of the bravery or any of the brilliance or any of the logic of Moses. All of the glory goes to God, so one of the most impressive things about Moses, one of the most impressive points in our study of the life of Moses, was that Moses was a mature believer. What was that mark of maturity? The ultimate test of maturity, I think, is pointed out in the Scripture in various ways and here is one illustration of it: The ultimate test of maturity is whether or not a man can give all of the glory to God.

Think about that. Think about that in relation to your own life. Perhaps somewhere along the line, you have learned that it is God who worketh in you both to will and to do of His good pleasure. Somewhere along the line, you have made yourself available to God and you have said, “God, I am going to walk at the direction of your Holy Spirit and You can use me in my office or on my campus or in my neighborhood, any way that you can. I am available to be used by the Holy Spirit,” and God has begun to use you. God is doing things through you and people are meeting Jesus Christ and people who have met Jesus Christ through the witness of someone else have perhaps been helped and strengthened by your work, and you are finding opportunities to serve the Lord. As you serve the Lord, the ultimate question comes: Is the Lord getting all the glory for that?

Jesus spoke to the disciples and said, “Let your life so shine before men that they may see your good works and glorify your Father , which is in heaven.” You know, that is a very difficult instruction. It is not quite so hard to let your light so shine before men that they may see your good works, but the rub comes when so often we let our light so shine and sometimes at great expense to ourselves, that men may see our good works, but we allow them to glorify us.

Moses was a man of God. Moses was a mature man of God because he gave all the glory to God, and in the words of Jesus' instruction, men saw his good works and glorified God. So, I say, this hymn is extremely revealing about the importance of Moses' spiritual life.

The Time of the Song

As we think about this hymn, we want to read through it and analyze various parts of it. We have read it and now we want to go back over it and look at it in some detail. The first thing that we want to notice concerning this song is the time of the song in verse 1. Notice:

Exodus 15:

1 Then sang Moses and the children of Israel this song unto the LORD, and spake…

The word then refers to what is recorded in chapter 14, verses 30-31. We read in verse 30:

Exodus 14:

30 Thus the LORD saved Israel that day out of the hand of the Egyptians; and Israel saw the Egyptians dead upon the sea shore.

They had, at the time of this song, been delivered from both the presence and the power of the Egyptians, and they were praising God because they were delivered from the presence and the power. Notice the significant statement in the last part of verse 30:

Exodus 14:

30 …and Israel saw the Egyptians dead upon the sea shore.

There is a beautiful picture of salvation in this verse and in the time of this song. Salvation is our deliverance from the presence and power of sin. In this period of life that we are living now, in this period between the time that we accept the Lord Jesus Christ as personal Savior and the time that we stand in His presence in Heaven, we have not yet been delivered from the presence of sin, but deliverance from the power of sin is available to us if we will take advantage of what God has given us. It is possible for us to be free from the power of sin. Jesus Christ died to make that possible, and the time is coming when we stand in the Lord's presence in Heaven when we will be free not only from the power of sin, but also from the presence of sin. So what we have in this chapter is a little picture of what is in store for us.

We will sing a song of praise to God very similar to this. In fact it is an interesting thing to notice that the book of Revelation tells us as John looked into Heaven and saw what was taking place in the future that the people gathered around the throne of God sang the song of Moses. The only song that we know of as a song of Moses is this one. It may be that there are some other songs of Moses. It may be that Moses will write a song before we get there and that is the one that we will sing, but the people in Heaven will sing a song of Moses. It may very possibly be this same song. It wouldn't hurt you to be reviewing it between now and then just in case. Get familiar with it because that might be the one we are going to sing when we get to Heaven.

This is something that we can enjoy and revel in because the day is coming when we, too, will be free from the presence of sin and the power of sin. What a wonderful thing! Don't you have trouble with sin? Isn't it a frustrating thing to have the presence of sin? As I say, we have been delivered from the power of sin if we will avail ourselves of God's strength, but there is always that presence of sin there. But there is the day coming when we will be able to praise God just like the Israelites did in this chapter.

Contrast to Israel Before their Deliverance

Notice the contrast to Israel before their deliverance. Turn back to chapter 2 of Exodus. In this chapter, the Israelites were singing also, but in chapter 2, they sang quite differently. Notice verse 23:

Exodus 2:

23 And it came to pass in process of time, that the king of Egypt died: and the children of Israel sighed by reason of the bondage, and they cried, and their cry came up unto God by reason of the bondage.
24 And God heard their groaning, and God remembered his covenant with Abraham, with Isaac, and with Jacob.
25 And God looked upon the children of Israel, and God had respect unto them.

Notice again the last part of verse 23:

Exodus 2:

23 …and the children of Israel sighed by reason of the bondage, and they cried, and their cry came up unto God by reason of the bondage.

We are told in these verses that God heard their cry and stepped in to intervene. It is another lesson aside from the thing that we want to think about primarily, but let me point out again that it took God some time, not that God was not able to do it any sooner, but God's perfect plan took time to unfold and God immediately began to work. The thing that we want to notice here in chapter 2 is that before God did work and while God was in the process of working, they were sighing and crying and groaning, but in this song in chapter 15 there is exultant singing. Their theme and their tune has completely changed.

If you think about it, only those who have been saved and know that they are saved can really sing in this way. Only those who are free from the power of sin, only those who have an assurance of where they are going after this life can sing in the way this song is sung. In fact, most of the world's music is in a minor key. Did you ever notice that? Much of the music that becomes popular and rises on the charts is music that is about a sad situation, groaning and crying about a lost love. “You've gone away and left me, Honey, and I'm all sad now,” and all of that sort of thing, or it is in a minor key musically. The world just inherently and subconsciously can only sing in a sad sort of way because they have not been delivered from the power of sin; but when God intervenes, then there can be excited, exalted music.

Theme of the Song

Let's notice,then,the theme of this song as it is revealed for us in verses 2-18. First, in verse 2, we read about the Lord's salvation:

Exodus 5:

2 The LORD is my strength and song, and he is become my salvation: he is my God, and I will prepare him an habitation; my father's God, and I will exalt him.

Notice in verse 1, as we look at the theme of this song, that they sang to the Lord: “Then spoke Moses and the children of Israel this song unto the LORD .” But, notice, as they sang to the Lord, they also sang about the Lord. Incidentally, all of our worshipful singing should be to the Lord. I hope that you do not consider the music here at Abilene Bible Church to just be preliminaries to our worship. I hope that you don't just put up with that in order to hear the teaching of the Word. Singing is a legitimate part of worship. Worship includes singing unto the Lord.

Also, proper worship in singing should include singing about the Lord, and all of our singing should not only be to the Lord, but also about the Lord. Notice the phrase in verse 2: “…I will exalt Him.” That is the theme of this song. “I will exalt Him,” not how I feel about Him or what I have done for Him, but, “I will exalt Him.”

The word Lord occurs twelve times in the eighteen verses that contain the song. Verse 1 is an introduction, and verse 20 and following are a report of some things that they did after the song, but from verses 2-19, we have twelve times where the Lord's name is mentioned. In addition to that, we find pronouns like He and Him and Thou and Thee thirty-three other times, so this hymn is all about God. Many of our hymns today really don't deserve the title hymn because they are about our love and work for God. Legitimate worship of God should not be our singing about ourselves and what we think about Him, but legitimate worship in song should be worship that extols Him, that talks about Him and only talks about ourselves in relation to what He has done for us and perhaps something to the effect that we cannot express our appreciation fully enough or something along that line. Worship should always be about Him. The theme of this song was the Lord entirely, nothing but the Lord.

The Lord's Salvation

This song specified several works and attributes of God, so we want to think about these attributes and works of God that are specified in this song. First, as we have mentioned already, the Lord's salvation, in verse 2:

Exodus 15:

2 The LORD is my strength and song, and he is become my salvation: he is my God, and I will prepare him an habitation; my father's God, and I will exalt him.

Salvation is a summary term for everything that this verse says about God. Notice: “He is my God, and I will prepare Him a habitation; my father's God…” All of these things are wrapped up in the concept of salvation. Salvation is not just some isolated, theological term that involves the fact that God redeemed humanity, but salvation speaks of a personal relationship to God. Notice in verse 2, Moses and the others sang, “He is my strength and song…” To know the God of the universe as your strength and song is only possible because of salvation. Maybe you have had the experience before you were saved of hearing others talk about the Lord or sing about the Lord and thinking that surely they don't mean that. Surely they can't sing about God in such a personal way. Salvation makes it possible for God to be our strength and our song, the object of our praise and the object of our love. All of that is possible because He is our salvation.

Incidentally, it is also interesting to notice that although men were saved before this time (There have been a number of individuals saved as described in the Old Testament before this point in time.), this is the first time that the word salvation is used personally. Back in chapter 14, Moses used the word salvation to predict the fact the God was going to save them from the Egyptians, but here is the first time in the Bible where someone speaks about my salvation . Isn't that an interesting thing that the first mention of my salvation is in the context of worshiping and thanking God?

I am afraid that we don't worship and thank God enough for our salvation. We pray and we mention it sometimes in passing, but how often do we specifically think about how wonderful it is to be saved from the power of sin and to really thank God for that salvation?

This verse also specifies another very important aspect of salvation and one that we cannot pass over. Notice in verse 2 again:

Exodus 15:

2 The LORD is my strength and song, and he is become my salvation: he is my God, and I will prepare him an habitation; my father's God, and I will exalt him.

Notice the word habitation there. The word habitation is a translation of the Hebrew word navah , and this word means “to be at home.” Do you see what they are praising God for? The God of creation has made it possible for us to be at home in His presence. You know what it means to be at home, don't you? You may travel somewhere or you may visit a friend or you may stay in a hotel. That hotel may be very nice. It may be nicer than your own home. Your friend's home may be nicer than your own home, but no matter how nice that place may be or no matter how welcome that hostess make you feel, it is not the same as being at home, is it?

I am always interested when people go in the hospital and I go to visit them, particularly if they are going to be there for more than twenty-four hours. When you go in and they say, “I am going home tomorrow,” they are all excited. I used to wonder why it is that somebody would be in a situation where they could lie in a bed and have people wait on them hand and foot and bring their food to them and just look up at the wall and see the television and would want to go home from a place like that. Then I was in the hospital as a patient for about a week, and I was just as excited as anybody I had talked to about going home. There is just something about being at home, isn't there?

Notice what the people of Israel said: “I will prepare Him a habitation. I will let God be at home in my heart.” Let me ask you, is God at home in your heart, in your life? Home, among all the other descriptions that we could give, is the place where we can relax and be ourselves. It is the place where we have it as we think it ought to be. No one else may think that's the way it ought to be, but it is the way that we want it to be, and it is the place where we can relax and be comfortable. Is God able to relax and be comfortable and feel at home in your heart?

After Moses and the Israelites saw God's salvation, they said, “I am going to make God a home in my heart.” As you reflect on your salvation, is that your response? God has done so much for me. He has delivered me from the power of sin, and someday He will deliver me from the very presence of sin, and I want to worship God, making it possible for Him to be at home and comfortable in my heart and life.

Some of our lives contain things and allow things with which I am afraid God would be very uncomfortable. The proper response to God's deliverance is to say, “I will prepare Him a habitation.”

One of the beautiful aspects of Heaven, as we are told in Revelation, chapter 21, is that God will comfort us and make us at home in Heaven. Shouldn't that be true all the more of God in our hearts and lives?

God's Character

Then in verses 3-7, we have some information about God's character . First, notice in verse 3, we have how a specification of God's wrath was satisfied:

Exodus 15:

3 The LORD is a man of war: the LORD is his name.
4 Pharaoh's chariots and his host hath he cast into the sea: his chosen captains also are drowned in the Red sea.

It goes on to describe in verses 3-7 how God's wrath is justified. The statement in verse 3 is surprising to most of the theologians and the preachers who are in business today because it is a common thing and a popular thing to talk about a God of love and to excuse a great deal of sin in our lives by saying, “Surely a God of love would never send anybody to Hell. Oh, I know that this is something that I should not be engaged in, but, after all, God is a God of love and He is not going to judge too harshly if I'm not obedient to His Word. Surely there is no reason for me to try to tell others about Jesus Christ. Really, we don't need to make too big a deal about this because God is a God of love, and He would never send anybody to Hell.”

I hope you are aware by now that God is a God of love, and there is no way that we can talk enough about that, but God is also a God of wrath. Notice verse 3:

Exodus 15:

3 The LORD is a man of war: the LORD is his name.

Then down in verse 7 you will notice:

Exodus 15:

7 And in the greatness of thine excellency thou hast overthrown them that rose up against thee: thou sentest forth thy wrath, which consumed them as stubble.

These verses are talking about the Egyptians and how God overcame them and did away with them, but these verses indicate the fact that God would not be just and holy and righteous if He did not deal properly in judgment with sin and rebellion. Are you aware of that? In fact, there would be no need for salvation if God was not a God of wrath. Did you know that? You see, God's love is only properly understood in the context of God's wrath. The Scripture tells us in John, chapter 3, where Jesus is speaking to Nicodemus:

John 3:

18 He that believeth on him is not condemned: but he that believeth not is condemned already, because he hath not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God.

Man sinned and came short of the glory of God, and God had to condemn the whole human race to Hell. That is the wrath of God, not upon individual sinners, but upon sin in which men are ensnared. A holy God cannot have anything to do with sin, and so His wrath condemns man to Hell, His wrath upon sin. But in that context of the wrath of God, the love of God shines through; and one of the most familiar verses, I am sure, in the entire Bible is John, chapter 3, verse 16:

John 3:

16 For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.

God chose to rescue from that wrath those who would accept the fact that Jesus Christ had died. The love of God, you see, is only properly understood in the context of the wrath of God. If there is no wrath of God, the love of God is meaningless. If there is no wrath of God, then there is no need to talk about a God of love. Even though God is a God of love, He is also a God of wrath; and He will condemn men to Hell, not because they have rejected Jesus Christ, but because they are already condemned because of their sin and failure inherited from the father of the whole human race if nothing else. Each man is guilty of his own sin also, and so the character of God has to do with His wrath, but also His love.

God's Strength

In verses 8-12, we have reference to His strength. The ease with which God overcame the Egyptians is described in these verses:

Exodus 15:

8 And with the blast of thy nostrils the waters were gathered together, the floods stood upright as an heap, and the depths were congealed in the heart of the sea.

All of these things have to do with the ease with which God overcame His enemies. The same idea of God's strength in dealing with His enemies is described for us in other places in the Scripture. When you have the time, look at Psalm 2, which deals with the fact that God will laugh at His enemies. God does laugh at those who try to attack Him and put Him down. This is the wrath of God, but also the love of God, and so it is along the same line as the verses that we have just been thinking about.

God's Mercy

In contrast and along with these verses about His strength and His wrath, notice in verse 13 we have a reference to the Lord's mercy:

Exodus 15:

13 Thou in thy mercy hast led forth the people which thou hast redeemed: thou hast guided them in thy strength unto thy holy habitation.

Aren't you thankful that though God is a God of wrath and God is a God of judgment and God, as Habakkuk says, is of pure eyes and cannot behold sin and cannot look upon iniquity, He is also a God of mercy?

If you took the time to analyze, you would find that in every passage of Scripture throughout the Word of God that deals with the wrath of God and the judgment of God, there is absolutely always included somewhere in that passage a reference to the mercy of God and the love of God. Isn't it a wonderful thing that God's wrath is superseded by His mercy and by His love?

One of the best examples of this is II Peter, chapter 3, verse 9:

II Peter 3:

9 The Lord is not slack concerning his promise, as some men count slackness; but is longsuffering to us-ward, not willing that any should perish, but that all should come to repentance.

The background out of which Peter speaks these words, “The Lord is not slack concerning his promise…” is that God has not sent judgment. The Scripture tells us in the first part of the chapter that God is a God of wrath and yet all of these years have gone by and God has not acted in judgment. Doesn't that sound familiar? Peter warns us in verse 3 that there shall come in the last days scoffers saying, “Where is the promise of His coming? Since the fathers fell asleep, all things continue as they were from the beginning.” Doesn't that sound familiar? You know that the talk of the Lord's coming back, the talk of the Lord's changing the status of things on earth, the talk of the Lord's dealing in judgment is a scoffing, laughing matter. You are marked as some kind of religious fanatic if you talk that way these days. This is all the more proof that we are in the last days because God said that this would happen in the last days.

Peter explains why God has withheld His judgment. It is not that He is slack in his promise. It is not that He is withholding something that He promised, but He is only withholding it because He is not willing that any should perish. There is the judgment of God. He is going to wipe out all that we know on the earth, and He is going to create a new heaven and a new earth. He is not going to do all of that over night. There is a whole program of tribulation and testing upon the earth, but ultimately, God is going to destroy the earth as we know it and create a new heaven and a new earth—a thousand and seven or so years after we are taken off of this earth in the Rapture. God is withholding that tremendous time of judgment upon the earth simply so that all who will can except Jesus Christ as personal Savior. This is the mercy of God in the context of the wrath of God.

God's Glory

Turn back to Exodus, chapter 15, verses 14-18, and notice a final aspect of God that this song contains, His glory. Certainly in the context of what we have just been thinking about, you can see the importance of the glory of God, can't you? God is a God of strength, God is a God of wrath and indignation against sin, but He is also a God of love who has acted in mercy and love toward us, so certainly God is due glory. Notice verse 14 as the song continues and Moses says:

Exodus 15:

14 The people shall hear, and be afraid: sorrow shall take hold on the inhabitants of Palestina.
15 Then the dukes of Edom shall be amazed; the mighty men of Moab, trembling shall take hold upon them; all the inhabitants of Canaan shall melt away.

These words were spoken forty years before the Israelites stepped into the promised land. Moses and the Israelites, as they sang this song, didn't realize that it was going to be that long, and it was that long only because of their own refusal to keep trusting God and to walk at His direction. It was forty years before these kinds of things were said, but every word in verses 14-15 came true. If we took the time to look through the record of the the conquest of the promised land, we would find that time and time again people sent delegations to Joshua, Moses' successor, and said, “Don't attack us. We will surrender.” In fact, it really came true before that. Jethro, Moses' father-in-law, in just a couple of chapters, is going to say, “Moses, the God whom you serve is a God of power and glory, and all honor is due His name.”

Later on, as the spies went into the land of Jericho to spy out the land, we find Rahab, the one who helped the spies, saying this very same thing: “I recognize the power of God, and I believe in Him because of what He has done to the Egyptians.”

The Gibeonites sent a delegation to Joshua in chapter 9, and said, “We will surrender. We don't even want to send out a delegation against you because of what we saw God do to the Egyptians.” Then notice verse 18 of chapter 15:

Exodus 15:

18 The LORD shall reign for ever and ever.

This is part of their song, but it implies also that men throughout the ages are going to continue to exalt the Lord Jesus Christ and the power of God. This is something that is always characteristic of God, and this is why God is so pleased when a man gives Him the glory, as we mentioned in the beginning that Moses did.

Moses' Postscript to the Song

Finally, in verses 19-21, we have a section that deals with the testimonies after the song. In verse 19, we have the testimony by the writer of the song. This is probably Moses' postscript to the song. He says they were singing because:

Exodus 15:

19 For the horse of Pharaoh went in with his chariots and with his horsemen into the sea, and the LORD brought again the waters of the sea upon them; but the children of Israel went on dry land in the midst of the sea.

This is the thing that occasioned the song. This is really not a part of the song, but it is Moses' note about why they sang this way. In verse 19, we have the scriptural record that this was a double miracle. You are well aware of the fact that liberal theologians try to tell us that the Israelites went across in a boggy, marshy part of the sea, and God really didn't roll back the sea; rather, they just went across in a muddy, shallow area there, and there really was no miracle involved.

It is a funny thing that Moses didn't realize that. Moses was right there on the scene, but he didn't know as much as these highly educated preachers that we have around today and he didn't realize it because he thought, according to verse 19, that God opened the sea and let them go across on dry land. It is an interesting thing, too, that Moses thought that the army of Pharaoh was drowned in that same muddy water that they had slogged across on.

I am sure you have heard the story of the fellow who was talking to a highly educated liberal, and he said, “You know, I just praise God that the Israelites were able to go across on dry land when God rolled back the sea,” and the liberal fellow said, “If you had as much opportunity for education as I have, you would know that that was not the case at all. They just went across in that muddy area.” Then this poor, uneducated literalist said, “Praise God.” The liberal said, “Wait a minute, I just explained there is nothing to praise God about.” Then the poor, uneducated fellow said, “There is too. Praise God that He drowned the whole Egyptian army in a little bit of muddy water.”

You see, either way you have a miracle. There is no way around this. The historical record and the record of Scripture is that the Israelites went across on dry land and the Egyptian army was drowned. If you are going to do away with one miracle, then you still have another miracle to contend with. God is due the glory, and evidently, it was this double miracle that occasioned this song. Evidently, this is a summary of God's power because what they were singing about was the power of God.

Testimony of Women After the Song

Then in verses 20-21, he talks about the testimony by the women after the song. We are mentioning this and the Scripture includes it to show that all of the people joined in the singing and praising of God. In fact, their joy was so great that it tells us here that they danced before the Lord, so they were completely consumed with their excitement and their love for the Lord.

Conclusion

If we could get an understanding and a grip on the thoughts here of the glory of God, the character of God, the power of God that is described in these verses, these thoughts make comments like Psalm 100, which says, “Make a joyful noise to the Lord, all ye lands,” and thoughts like Jude, 24-25 which says:

Jude:

24 Now unto him that is able to keep you from falling, and to present you faultless before the presence of his glory with exceeding joy,
25 To the only wise God our Saviour, be glory and majesty, dominion and power, both now and ever. Amen.

I wonder, do you realize the great things that God has done, and yet He is your personal God? This God of deliverance, is He at home in your heart? Have you made a place of habitation for Him?


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